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May. 03, 2012

Studying Dragonfly Swarms with Citizen Science

by Guest Blogger

In July of 2009, entomologist Christine Goforth and a friend arrived at a lake to collect water samples. They had worked at the lake many times, but noticed that something was different that day: several hundred dragonflies were flying over the grass."We often saw dragonflies, but there were 50 times the usual number and they weren’t in their usual places," explains Christine. "We knew something exciting was happening, so we jotted down notes."Then they were gone.

citizen science, animal behavior, animals, biology, bugs, citizen science, dragonflies, ecology, education, entomology, environment, insects, nature, Science, swarms, The Dragonfly Swarm Project, University of Arizona, water
Aug. 01, 2011

Changing Currents Turns Students into Environmental Scientists

by Guest Blogger

Changing Currents, a project originating in Toronto, Canada, familiarizes middle- and high-school students with local watersheds and teaches them how to conduct water quality analyses. This is a great way for students to become environmental scientists for a day! After heading out to a local stream and donning hip waders, students collect water samples and analyze their data. Through this program, students get out in nature for a while and learn about the importance of healthy aquatic ecosystems.

Citizen Science Buzz, Science, Canada, changing currents, citizen science, environmental science, high school, middle school, river, secondary students, stream, Teachers' TalkingScience, water, water quality
Jul. 09, 2011

The Rocket’s Red Glare… and Other Sensory Surprises

by Guest Blogger

One of the things that’s surprising about a shuttle launch is that, while our mental images of the event are usually integrated storylines, the experience itself actually isolates and disambiguates each sensory channel. The syncopated inputs first arrest the eyes, then overwhelm the ears, then rock through every atom in our bodies before leaving us -- momentarily and then for all eternity -- completely warmed, hollowed out, and in utter surrender.

Science
Jul. 08, 2011

Eyewitness to History

by Guest Blogger

The first thing most people who have seen a Shuttle launch tell you is how HUGE it looks. But I was struck by the other-worldly color of the plume. It was like liquid metal, and radiant in the way the Sun is: brilliant light and a warm expanding sphere. Then, the sound. Pressure waves barged into and through my bones. Popcorn firecracker sounds came when the Shuttle was nearly out of sight, but then lingered in a mis-matched audio/visual experience that I wish everyone could have seen. It was unforgettable proof of what we know about the speed of light versus the speed of sound.

Science, nasa, space shuttle
Jul. 07, 2011

Poetry of Possibility

by Guest Blogger

At this morning’s NASA press briefing, Shuttle Weather Officer Kathy Winters (yes, that’s really her name) said there was a 70% chance that weather conditions would prevent Atlantis from launching as planned tomorrow. I recently asked a long-time space reporter –- who’s covered the shuttle program closely for more than 20 years –- how many attempts it’s taken to fulfill the 134 launches leading up to this one, the last and final STS-135. The answer? About 500. So, statistically speaking, a NON-launch is about three times more likely than an actual launch.

Science, nasa, space
Jun. 01, 2011

World Science Festival: Rethinking Science

by Guest Blogger

By Shelby Kay-Fantozzi, American University Listening to some of the greatest thinkers and adventurers of our time speak about the wide range of their respective fields , I came to realize not only how important science is, but how it permeates almost every aspect of our lives.

Events & Exhibits, Teen to Teen, World Science Festival
Nov. 15, 2010

Artful Presentation Styles at the NASW/CASW Meeting

by Guest Blogger

Leo Kretzner reviews talks from the National Association of Science Writers/Council for the Advancement of Science Writing Meeting. Since many talks were given simultaneously during NASW/CASW, it was impossible to take all of them in –- but I would classify all the presentations I saw as good to outstanding. It’s interesting how different people put their subjects and themselves across. Scientists and journalists are rightfully concerned with content over packaging, but solid content delivered with style is a very powerful combination.

Science & the Arts, science presentation
Nov. 03, 2010

Student Reflections on ISME (Intensive Science and Mathematics Experience)

by Guest Blogger

Through ACI/ISME we have achieved a step on a ladder that allows us to stand out in the midst of our future competitors and even in the classroom. There is a vast sense of pride in class when we are asked “what did you do this summer?” The truth is, because of ISME, the question should really be “what did you not do this summer?”

ISME, TalkingScience for Teens, aci, intensive science and mathematics experience, isme
Oct. 07, 2010

Welcome ISME Student Bloggers!

by Guest Blogger

My name is Amy Abeln. I work with high school students in the Chicago area where I help administrate a program called the Intensive Science and Mathematics Experience, ISME for short, run by the Associated Colleges of Illinois. Our inaugural crew of students is now in its second year and we have just welcomed a new group of 9th graders to embark on their four year commitment to a program that combines the strength of ACI’s College Readiness Program with more hands-on science and math preparation.

ISME
Oct. 06, 2010

A prayer a day keeps the doctor away?

by Guest Blogger

In an episode of The Simpsons, Homer is shocked to learn that his neighbor Ned Flanders is 65, despite looking maybe 40. Flanders attributes his youthful vitality to a daily dose of Vitamin C -- short for church. If this sounds far-fetched, know that a new study performed by a group at Penn State has found evidence to suggest a connection between faith and health.

Guest Post
Apr. 14, 2009

Alex and the Principle of Inertia

by Guest Blogger

As it turns out, Spring break is great for science experiments. There's plenty of time and plenty of scope, especially if the weather is lousy and you have a curious five-year-old.So, Alex decided that he wanted to do three experiments while he was on break. We found them – as we have found most of the things we have done – in Pop Bottle Science, which features 79 easy experiments that are not too time-consuming or messy. And in addition to a book full of experiments, the Pop bottle breaks ...

Hands-on Activities, Tabletop Science, Alex, bubbles, Dancing Raisins, Inertia, Tabletop Science
Mar. 23, 2009

Alex and the Warm Toast

by Guest Blogger

My five-year old son Alexander and I have tried to get into the habit of doing one science experiment each weekend. But last weekend, faced with plenty of time on our hands and a couple of Spring days that were sunny but really cold, we decided to stay inside and do four experiments. Like science itself, they took a bunch of different forms.The first experiment came from the book One Minute Mysteries: 65 Short Mysteries You Solve With Science. I read a riddle to Alex that essentially asked if you ...

Hands-on Activities, Tabletop Science, Alex, Tabletop Science, Warm Toast
Mar. 18, 2009

Rocking Out With Rock-It Science

by Guest Blogger

By Susan ScheuerThe Rock-it Science concert, an event held in conjunction with the Sensation and Emotion Network that took place under pink, blue and yellow strobe lights at the Highline Ballroom on Tuesday, March 3rd, gave neuroscientists, geneticists, and PhD students in Systems Biology, among others, the chance to "get down." Four of the rock bands in the long line-up of performers featured well-known scientists who, in the words of music producer Tim Sommer, “pursue music on a level that’s a little higher than that of a hobby.” It was ...

Science & the Arts, Pardis Sabetti, Rock-it Science, Rufus Wainwright, The Amygdaloids, The Spinozas
Mar. 18, 2009

The Atom Smashers

by Guest Blogger

By Ben LillieRecently I attended the opening of The Atom Smashers, a documentary byClayton Brown and Monica Long Ross from 137 Films. It was held,appropriately, at the Museum of Science and Industry. Unfortunately,this had the effect of providing us with what is probably the smallestscreen in the city of Chicago. That can easily be forgiven because thefilm itself was exceptional.In blurb form, The Atom Smashers is about scientists at the Tevatron,a 4 mile diameter machine hosted at Fermi National AcceleratorLaboratory (Fermilab) in the suburbs of Chicago and currently theworlds largest ...

Science on the Screen
Mar. 17, 2009

Book Review: Polar Worlds

by Guest Blogger

By DNLeeThis month marks the end of a two year journey of exploration, discovery, wonder, and advocacy. March 31st marks the end of International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2009.In fact, Wednesday, March 18, 2009 is International Polar Day, celebrating Polar Oceans. The marine ecosystem is a very important part of the polar biome. The animals of the polar regions - both the north and south poles - depend on a variety of seafood species for nutrition: krill, fish, ocean birds, and ocean mammals. The polar food webs are complex and interesting. ...

Science & the Arts, Polar Worlds
Mar. 13, 2009

What Makes You Happy?

by Guest Blogger

By IUCNDoes buying endless products that you don't really need actually make you happy? Do we only crave objects because of clever marketing? Wild Talk speaks to writer Alistair McIntosh about what it will take to make the world's economy truly green and how ordinary people will have to change their values to make the dream come true. To listen, swfobject.registerObject("ssg_gplayer_object-1508-0", "9.0.0", "http://www.talkingscience.org/wp-content/plugins/ssg-wordpress-google-audio-player/swfobject/expressInstall.swf"); click here. swfobject.registerObject("ssg_gplayer_object-1508-1", "9.0.0", "http://www.talkingscience.org/wp-content/plugins/ssg-wordpress-google-audio-player/swfobject/expressInstall.swf"); Wild Talk - Alistair McIntosh 5.30MB Greening the economyPhoto: IUCN

Wild Talk, happiness
Mar. 13, 2009

Water, Water, Everywhere

by Guest Blogger

By IUCNThis month more than 25,000 people will converge on Istanbul in Turkey to discuss the world's water issues. Big business, developers, conservationists and governments will gather in an attempt to place water high on the international agenda. Mark Smith, Head of IUCN's Water Programme, talks to Wild Talk about whether this will happen and explains the importance of water in the climate change debate. To listen, swfobject.registerObject("ssg_gplayer_object-1510-0", "9.0.0", "http://www.talkingscience.org/wp-content/plugins/ssg-wordpress-google-audio-player/swfobject/expressInstall.swf"); click here. Related Downloads swfobject.registerObject("ssg_gplayer_object-1510-1", "9.0.0", "http://www.talkingscience.org/wp-content/plugins/ssg-wordpress-google-audio-player/swfobject/expressInstall.swf"); Wild Talk - Water, Water, Everywhere 3.60MBRelated LinkIUCN Water ProgrammeWorld Water Forum

Wild Talk, water
Mar. 13, 2009

Geneva Motor Show Goes Green

by Guest Blogger

By IUCNWild Talk paid a visit to the Geneva Motor Show this month to see just how committed car companies are to the green movement. With more and more electric cars on display, it's clear that every brand wants to get in on the act. Wild Talk speaks to technical experts who talk us through some of the cars on offer, customers who are keen to buy them, and a new company which is planning to set up a grid for charging electric cars using only renewable energy sources. swfobject.registerObject("ssg_gplayer_object-1512-0", "9.0.0", ...

Wild Talk, Geneva, motor show
Mar. 10, 2009

Another (Brief) Philosophical Tangent

by Guest Blogger

By Hugh LippincottIn a comment on the quantitative Doppler effect post, my mother had the following to say:"Mom again. I have a feeling that however clearly you explain it, some people who have never taken advanced math in any form will never really understand it. I like much better the idea of the dark matter, the neutrinos racing through my finger-tips, etc. Perhaps you should select your subject-matter differently - when you say you are a physicist, what questions do people at cocktail parties ask you? I'm sure not about ...

Hands-on Activities, Tabletop Science, Doppler Effect
Mar. 10, 2009

The Doppler Effect (Quantitative)

by Guest Blogger

By Hugh LippincottThe first version of the qualitative post contained a paragraph at the end in which I did some real math (I have since removed that paragraph, as it appears in a different form in this post). My mother loved the bit about the tennis and thought she had really grasped the general idea; alas, when confronted with a paragraph containing algebraic variables, she felt somewhat bewildered and lost because I hadn't given it enough of an introduction. I was reminded that she hasn't really done any advanced math ...

Hands-on Activities, Tabletop Science, Doppler Effect
Mar. 10, 2009

The Doppler Effect (Qualitative)

by Guest Blogger

By Hugh LippincottIn my first post, I talked about how the Doppler effect is a shift in the observed frequency of a wave caused by the relative motion of a source and an observer. In this, my first detailed post, I will try to explain how that actually works. As my mom plays tennis, and this blog is ostensibly aimed at her, I'm going to use a rather tortured tennis analogy.Suppose my mother is using a ball machine to practice her ground strokes. The ball machine spits out a tennis ...

Hands-on Activities, Tabletop Science, The Doppler Effect
Mar. 10, 2009

How To Find Dark Matter

by Guest Blogger

By Hugh LippincottIn the last post, I said that dark matter could be a new type of particle that only interacts weakly, which is why we've never seen it before. The goal of my research is to build a very sensitive radiation detector and directly detect a WIMP (by observing the energy released on that rare occasion when a WIMP does interact with something in the detector). This is hard. Given our current limits on dark matter, we expect to see maybe a handful of events per year in our ...

Hands-on Activities, Tabletop Science, dark matter
Mar. 10, 2009

Dark Matter: An Explanation for Mom

by Guest Blogger

By Hugh LippincottIn the first post of this blog, I briefly discussed how galaxy rotation curves provide evidence for the existence of dark matter - I didn't really said anything about what dark matter actually is. We've only said that it exists, that it has mass (i.e. it interacts with gravity), and that it doesn't interact with light like every day matter. The truth is, even though dark matter is 85% of the total matter in the universe, we don't know what it is because we've never seen it directly. ...

Hands-on Activities, Tabletop Science, dark matter
Mar. 10, 2009

Dark Matter

by Guest Blogger

By Hugh LippincottAs mentioned in the summary, this blog will be my attempt at explaining what I study to my mom and any other person out there who might be interested. What do I do? I am trying to directly detect dark matter.Today, the scientific community generally accepts that 95% of the universe is made up of stuff that we’ve never seen before and do not understand; the chart at the right shows the composition of our universe as measured by the NASA/WMAP satellite (the subject of a future series ...

Hands-on Activities, Tabletop Science, cosmic microwave, dark energy, dark matter, Hugh Lippincott, nasa
Mar. 06, 2009

Arctic Expeditions

by Guest Blogger

By IUCNClive Tesar, Head of Communications at WWF's Arctic Network initiative, talks to Wild Talk about the upcoming Catlin Arctic Survey, an expedition from Northern Canada to the Arctic that will measure the thickness of the sea ice. He explains how this will help scientists make models of the rate at which the sea ice is melting and explains the implications for all creatures, both great and small, that live in the Arctic. To listen, swfobject.registerObject("ssg_gplayer_object-1460-0", "9.0.0", "http://www.talkingscience.org/wp-content/plugins/ssg-wordpress-google-audio-player/swfobject/expressInstall.swf"); click here. Related Downloads swfobject.registerObject("ssg_gplayer_object-1460-1", "9.0.0", "http://www.talkingscience.org/wp-content/plugins/ssg-wordpress-google-audio-player/swfobject/expressInstall.swf"); Wild Talk - Arctic 4.53MB ArcticPhoto: WWF-CANON / Peter ...

Wild Talk, artic, Canada, Clive Tesar
Mar. 03, 2009

The History of Life by Design

by Guest Blogger

By Nikki Saint Bautista"We're going to talk about intelligent design," Luis Campos opened his talk about "Genetic Engineering from the Experimental Garden to Synthetic Biology" at the at the CUNY Graduate Center Wednesday evening. "No, not the intelligent design you often hear about in the news, but life by design."The talk was put together by the Liberal Studies Program of the Graduate Center, City University of New York, the Metropolitan New York Section of the History of Science Society, and the Section for History and Philosophy of Science and Technology ...

Science & the Arts, Daniel Trembly MacDougal, Luis Campos, Mutation Theory, van Harten
Feb. 26, 2009

Martin Waugh: A Physicist Turned Artist

by Guest Blogger

By Ted KinsmanThis week I am pleased to introduce Martin Waugh, a physicist turned artist. Martin is trained as a physicist and he has transformed his basement into a high speed studio dedicated solely to photographing water droplets. There is little doubt that he is the world leader in the field. His images have been used by companies as diverse as Coca Cola and the Discovery TV show "Time Warp." It is hard to envision how something so simple as a droplet of ...

Science & the Arts, art, Martin Waugh, photography, phycics
Feb. 25, 2009

The Science of Kissing is All About Chemistry

by Guest Blogger

By Alan S. BrownI remember kissing my first girlfriend, Barbara, in her backyard when I was 17. It was a warm spring day and things were starting to warm up when she suddenly pushed me away and said, "Why are we doing this?"I tried the answer most likely to reapply my lips to hers, "Because it feels good."That didn't work. "I mean," she continued, "would we kiss if the whole culture hadn't taught us to kiss? Would people naturally want to push their tongues into someone else's mouth?"I don't remember ...

Science, AAAS, Alan Brown, chemistry, kiss
Feb. 25, 2009

High Heels and Peacocks: How Fashion Week is a Display of Darwinian Fitness

by Guest Blogger

By Nikki Saint BautistaBRYANT PARK, NYC- As the stock market continues to plunge and daily news reports remain bleak, the 2009 Mercedes-Benz fashion week offers more than slight stimulation of the local economy- it's a study on the rules of attraction.Headbands in the Alexandre Herchcovitch collection, Anna Sui's multi-patterned Bohemian dresses and Calvin Klein's symmetrical tight-fitted men’s suits all enhance our perception of the wearer’s good genes. Therefore, the runway at a time of economic distress is not a self-indulgent waste of resources; it is a display of Darwinian fitness ...

Science & the Arts, fashion, handicap
Feb. 23, 2009

Narrowing Down the Suspects

by Guest Blogger

By Blair BollesA Neanderthal man, as depicted at the American Museum of Natural History. If we put this fellow in some clothes and sent him on his way, how would he do?As reported previously on Babel's Dawn, the draft version of the Neanderthal genome was presented in Chicago last week (press release here) and it confirms the earlier finding that Neanderthal’s share the same FOXP2 gene found in humans. FOXP2 is the most important gene known to support language. Without it in its human form, rapid speech and the ability ...

Science
Feb. 20, 2009

Step Inside an Underwater World

by Guest Blogger

By IUCNThe oceans are home to some of our most fascinating creatures, as well as those most at risk of extinction. Photographer Juergen Freund has spent the last 14 years taking underwater images of many threatened marine species, particularly in waters off the Philippines and Australia where he lives. Through his award-winning photography he hopes to shed some light on the majesty and the plight of ocean dwelling organisms. He speaks to Wild Talk about three of his pictures. To listen and see the pictures, click herePortrait of a Minke ...

Wild Talk, IUCN, oceans
Feb. 20, 2009

Planet Ocean in Peril

by Guest Blogger

By IUCNDeep sea explorer Sylvia Earle has led more than 50 expeditions and clocked up some 6,000 hours underwater. A dedicated champion of the deep ocean, Wild Talk catches up with her over the phone from her home in California, to ask how she felt when she won the 2009 TED prize. Sylvia discusses the dire situation planet ocean is in and speaks of her hope that we still have time to turn the situation around. To listen, swfobject.registerObject("ssg_gplayer_object-1338-0", "9.0.0", "http://www.talkingscience.org/wp-content/plugins/ssg-wordpress-google-audio-player/swfobject/expressInstall.swf"); click here. var flashvars = { file: "http://cmsdata.iucn.org/media/sylvia_earle_final.mp3" }; var params = { allowfullscreen: "true", allowscriptaccess: "always" }; var ...

Wild Talk, IUCN, oceans, Sylvia Earle
Feb. 20, 2009

IUCN On The Road to Copenhagen

by Guest Blogger

Will the world finally agree this year on how to combat climate change? All hopes are pinned on the United Nations climate change meeting in Copenhagen in December, which should come up with an agreement to succeed the Kyoto protocol that runs out in 2012. Wild Talk speaks to IUCN's Climate Change Officer, Ninni Ikkala, about the challenges ahead and what IUCN is doing to help keep negotiations on track. To listen, swfobject.registerObject("ssg_gplayer_object-1339-0", "9.0.0", "http://www.talkingscience.org/wp-content/plugins/ssg-wordpress-google-audio-player/swfobject/expressInstall.swf"); click here. var flashvars = { file: "http://cmsdata.iucn.org/media/road_to_copenhagen_ninni_final.mp3" }; var params = { allowfullscreen: "true", allowscriptaccess: "always" }; var attributes = false; ...

Wild Talk, Copenhagen, IUCN
Feb. 20, 2009

On The Lookout For The Lynx

by Guest Blogger

By IUCN $().ready(function(){ $(".commenting").addCommenting({ corePath: rootCore, langID: 1 }); $("#topComment").click(function(){ $(".comment-list").addClass('show').prev("a.toggle").addClass('open'); }); $("#topForm").click(function(){ $(".comment-form").addClass('show').prev("a.toggle").addClass('open'); }); }); Looking for the Eurasian Lynx (Lynx lynx) in Switzerland's Jura mountains is like looking for a needle in a haystack. Although they were re-introduced to the country in the 1970s, there are only about 100 alive today. Wild Talk took to the hills with wildlife biologist Fridolin Zimmermann to check the camera traps set up in the Jura to monitor the population. To listen, swfobject.registerObject("ssg_gplayer_object-1340-0", "9.0.0", "http://www.talkingscience.org/wp-content/plugins/ssg-wordpress-google-audio-player/swfobject/expressInstall.swf"); click here. To take a peek at the lynx favourite whereabouts in the Jura and the camera traps, see below . var flashvars ...

Wild Talk, IUCN, Lynx
Feb. 20, 2009

Scenes from SEAMONSTER

by Guest Blogger

The University of Alaska Southeast in Juneau (Alaska's capital) is the recipient of federal NASA and NOAA grants to develop a digital network to monitor climate change on the Juneau Icefield. UAS is the only university in North America with access to several glacial watersheds. The UAS SEAMONSTER (Southeast Alaska Monitoring Network for Science Telecommunications Education and Research) program gives undergraduates extraordinary opportunities to engage in cutting edge research. A comprehensive network of communications infrastructure, mobile sensors with moving data streams, existing weather stations and Global Positioning System measurements ...

Science, Matt Heaver, SEAMONSTER
Feb. 20, 2009

University of Alaska Southeast Presents at the American Geophysical Union Meeting

by Guest Blogger

UAS Environmental Science faculty and students were part of nearly a dozen presentations at the American Geophysical Union meeting December 15-19, 2008 in San Francisco. Physics professor Matt Heavner presented an interactive "melt model" and virtual tour of watersheds and glaciers in the SEAMONSTER sensor web project.* Heavner started attending the conference as an undergraduate, and has not missed the yearly event since 1993. The 2008 gathering at Moscone Center drew more than 16,000 scientists and academics from around the world.Photo: UAS Environmental Science senior Josh Jones.“It’s overwhelming, there is ...

Science, american geophysical union, university of alaska southeast
Feb. 20, 2009

Nick's SEAMONSTER Experience

by Guest Blogger

By Nick KorzenWhen I came to Juneau, Alaska in January of 2007, I never thought I would get such a great opportunity. Thanks to UAS professors Matt Heavner and Eran Hood who took me on the SEAMONSTER (South East Alaska Monitoring Network for Science, Telecommunications, Education, and Research) team.Within the first couple weeks of work, I was building weather stations and solar panel mounts, which were then deployed in the surrounding Juneau area. Since these areas are somewhat remote, I was able to take many helicopter trips to various ...

Science, Nick Korzen, SEAMONSTER, university of alaska southeast
Feb. 17, 2009

Why is Breakfast So Important?

by Guest Blogger

By Kevin KirshnerThis is the first of a three-part series about Breakfast, Obesity & Juvenile Diabetes. Please take the time to write a comment or relate some personal experience -- help us make a connection through your stories. So, Why is Breakfast So Important?Confused? Well you're not alone. Over 50% of people regularly skip eating breakfast. At one time or another everyone reading this has done it, and left home for school or work without taking just a few minutes to start the day properly, with ...

breakfast, diabetes, kevin kirshner
Feb. 11, 2009

Getting to know Kirindy Mitea...

by Guest Blogger

By Meredith BarrettThe first couple of days I spent getting to know the place and exploring the trails with Rebecca, who's been very helpful in introducing me to the possibilities here. At Kirindy I'm going to focus on the experimental component of my lemur health project. Experiment you say? Like white lab coats and cooking up chemicals? Not quite, but I am trying to make it a controlled study in the midst of field conditions that are hard to control. I'm interested in how the intense dry season here in ...

Science, lemur, madagascar
Feb. 09, 2009

Is That Really What I Think You're Doing?

by Guest Blogger

By Meredith BarrettThat's right, I'm taking the temperature...of one of the smallest primates on earth. It's important to monitor how the mouse lemurs are doing during the evaluation, and it's also quite interesting to see how their body temperatures range, especially since mouse lemurs are capable of daily torpor during the colder winter season. We've seen body temperatures that range from 92.7° to 98.7° Fahrenheit so far.See This Video

Science, lemur, madagascar
Feb. 09, 2009

Indri indri? Call for you!

by Guest Blogger

By KL BatesWorking with Indris last summer definitely captured my interest. They are beautiful, graceful and stately lemurs, and they possess a great importance to the Malagasy people. Tradition states that the Indri, or Babakoto in Malagasy, is the "grandfather of the forest," an ancestor to the inhabitants of Madagascar.Click to hear the eerily beautiful call of the Indri. Groups of Indri use this call to communicate and demarcate their territory.

Science & the Arts, indri, lemur, madagascar
Feb. 09, 2009

Catch A Falling Star

by Guest Blogger

By K L BatesThis summer I'll be focusing on the smaller species, namely the mouse lemurs. But last summer and in the future I'll continue to work on Eulemur and Indri, who both require a little more complicated capture strategy.People often ask just how exactly we go about catching a lemur, so I thought I might share this little video and describe the process.The capture team, made up of a darter, a couple of spotters and 4-5 people designated as runners, walks slowly through the forest. If a lemur is ...

Science, lemur, madagascar
Feb. 09, 2009

Microcebus Super-Sleuth

by Guest Blogger

by Meredith BarrettIt seems as though there are new Microcebus species popping up every week...what once had been defined as an eastern and a western species now has been amended to include several species. This has caused some ongoing controversy as scientists debate which species should be considered separate and which should not. But the DNA will tell the tale-- that's why we’re sure to collect small samples of skin to use for genetic analyses. In addition to this data, we're also noting all the variations in color and size ...

Science, lemur, madagascar, microcebus
Feb. 09, 2009

Art's Crafty Birth

by Guest Blogger

By Edmund Blair BollesThe Venus of Tan-Tan: is this object the earliest known example of human craftsmanship? Or is it a stone that happens to look like a human figure and happened to lie amongst many 400 thousand year old tools? The delicate detail of the hands is what leans me toward accepting the work as an artifact.We all remember the grilled cheese sandwich with the face of Jesus on it. Suppose that grilled cheese was 400 thousand years old and somehow survived for archaeologists to find. What would they ...

Science & the Arts, anthropology, philip case, robert bednarik, thomas wynn, venus of tan-tan
Feb. 09, 2009

A Drip of Water

by Guest Blogger

By Ted KinsmanThis is a relatively simple image of a drop of water. The images from a simple drop are dependent on the speed of the drop-- in this case the height it falls from, the viscosity or the fluid, and the depth of water the droplet falls into. The time the image is taken after the water's collision with the surface will also greatly influence the image. If the high speed flash it triggered too soon, the droplet will still be in mid-air. Too late, and the collision ...

Science & the Arts, drip of water, science photography
Feb. 09, 2009

Nothing But Love For Ya', Baby!

by Guest Blogger

The Wildlife Conservation Society's New York Aquarium twenty-month-old baby Pacific walrus Akituusaq shows his love to keeper Paul Moylett for Valentine's Day. The winter months are the best time to visit the Aquarium when the walruses enjoy the cold weather. There's lots to do with daily public feedings of walruses, penguins, sharks, sea otters and seals. The Aquarium is open every day from 10:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Something new and exciting is always happening at the New York Aquarium in Coney Island, Brooklyn. Photo credit: Julie Larsen Maher ...

Science & the Arts, new york aq
Feb. 05, 2009

Global Cooling or Global Warming: Pick Your Poison

by Guest Blogger

By Justin PeacockI found the 2008 Presidential elections memorable for several reasons, not the least of which was the list of characters playing out the drama. One of the most interesting was the Republican vice-presidential nominee, a little-known, spunky governor from Alaska, Sarah Palin. Among Palin's more memorable and disturbing comments was her belief that global warming was not man-made, scientifically proven, or important. In an interview with Newsmax, Palin stated, "I'm not one though who would attribute to being man-made.” Her spokesman was also quoted as saying ...

Science, global warming, Justin Peacock, sarah palin
Feb. 02, 2009

Love is in the Water

by Guest Blogger

By Ted KinsmanReproduction is one of the driving biological forces and often commands readers attention. This photo shoot was done under difficult conditions. Toads are one of the first amphibians to mate in our northern climates and often beat out other species by a month. Here in New York these toads will only mate for two days in the ice cold waters in the early days of April. The mating starts at dusk and is most active if there has been rain. So there ...

Science, Science & the Arts, frogs, reproduction, science photography
Feb. 02, 2009

It's Black History Month! Celebrate Science and African-American Achievements

by Guest Blogger

By DNLeeAll year is great time to learn more about science and the people who make the discoveries. But February offers a great opportunity to learn about the achievements of African-Americans (and others from the African Diaspora) in the sciences. So I'm introducing a new Carnival: Diversity in Science. Blogs of every genre is invited to write a special feature post about a person who is a pioneer and/or innovator in any of the amazing fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM).Tell us all about him/her How has this ...

Science & the Arts, african american innovators
Feb. 02, 2009

It's Marmota Monax Day!

by Guest Blogger

By DNLee photo from the Alaska Dept. of Fish & GameWhat's Marmota monax Day, you're asking? Well it's Groundhog's Day. Marmota monax is the scientific name for ground hogs, also known as woodchucks. And how much wood would a woodchuck chuck, if a woodchuck could chuck wood? None. They spend their time eating plant materials like flowers and roots and the occasional juicy bug.Though we celebrate groundhogs today, it's actually an inconvenience to them. They are hibernators and don't usually wake up until springtime, in March or April.Groundhog Day is ...

Science & the Arts

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