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Jul. 29, 2014

Picture of the Week: Galaxy Bonanza

by Becca Cudmore

Hubble's most recent photograph of the universe reveals more than 10,000 galaxies, including young ultraviolet ones.

hubble, space, starlight, ultraviolet, infrared, stars, galaxy, galaxies
Jul. 25, 2014

Dune Discussion Question: Week #1

by Annie Minoff

The first discussion question for this summer's SciFri Book Club selection, Dune.

Jul. 22, 2014

Picture of the Week: Io Moth Caterpillar

by Julie Leibach

This silk moth symbolizes National Moth Week, which has gone global.

moth week, national moth week, io moth, kenn kafuman, andrei sourakov, dave markowitz
Jul. 21, 2014

The SciFri Book Club Reads Dune

by Annie Minoff

This summer’s pick is a bona fide science fiction classic: Frank Herbert’s ecological epic Dune.

frank herbert, dune, scifri, scifri book club, sci-fi
Jul. 17, 2014

Sea, Temperature, CO2 Levels All Rise in 2013

by Ira Flatow

NOAA releases its State of the Climate Report for 2013.

global warming, climate change, CO2, earth, greenhouse gases, noaa
Jul. 14, 2014

Picture of the Week: Harlequin Bug Eggs

by Becca Cudmore

These tiny black-and-white cylinders each host a life-sucking insect.

stink bug, stinkbug, harlequin bug, insect, toxic, camouflage, glucosinolates
Jul. 10, 2014

You Don't Need ESP to Predict Behavior

by William Poundstone

An excerpt from William Poundstone's Rock Breaks Scissors.

esp, william poundstone, rock, paper, scissors
Jul. 08, 2014

Picture of the Week: Domed Land Snail

by Chau Tu

This tiny snail lives in one of the world’s deepest cave systems.

snail, domed land snail, croatia, tiny animal, shell, new species, cave
Jul. 07, 2014

Space Vs. Food: Whose Side Are You On?

by Danielle Dana

We're pitting two of our favorite topics against each other. Are you #TeamSpace or #TeamFood?

#TeamSpace #TeamFood Fundraising
Jul. 03, 2014

Sock Puppets on Steroids: The Internet's Fake Personalities

by Charles Seife

An excerpt from Virtual Unreality: Just Because The Internet Told You, How Do You Know It’s True?

Jul. 03, 2014

Picture of the Week: Kawah Ijen Volcano

by Chau Tu

This Indonesian volcano burns blue at night, but that’s not lava you’re seeing.

volcano, crater lake, kawah ijen, sulfur, sulfuric acid, miners, indonesia
Jun. 27, 2014

Goodies From #CephalopodWeek

by Brandon Echter

For the past week, Science Friday’s Cephalopod Week has celebrated these amazing, beautiful, and mysterious creatures. We’ve compiled all the SciFri stories we shared this week in one place.

Jun. 25, 2014

Picture of the Week: Blue-Lined Octopus

by Julie Leibach

This venomous octopus packs a punch, but it’s more likely to hide than launch a poisonous attack.

julian finn, museum victoria, octopus
Jun. 19, 2014

Chinook Salmon Could Make Splashy Return

by Becca Cudmore

Some scientists predict that record numbers of fall Chinook will return to the Columbia River Basin this year.

salmon, chinook, fall chinook, bounty, pacific northwest, oregon
Jun. 18, 2014

On the Oregon Truffle Scent

by Julie Leibach

Oregon leads the country in commercial truffle production, boasting several native culinary varieties. And the best way to find them is to enlist the help of man’s best friend.

truffles, oregon, fungi, oregon truffle, dogs, umami truffle dogs
Jun. 17, 2014

Fighting the Machines

by Daniel Wilson

An excerpt from Daniel Wilson's new novel, Robogenesis.

robots, fiction, war, daniel wilson, science fiction, sci fi, robogenesis
Jun. 12, 2014

Proving Dad's Worth (With Science)

by Paul Raeburn

An excerpt from Do Fathers Matter?

fathers, paul raeburn, dads, family
May. 08, 2014

Alan Friedman, We Will Miss You

by Ira Flatow

The former director of the New York Hall of Science was a champion for the public's understanding of and involvement with science.

Jun. 09, 2014

Picture of the Week: Munk's Devil Ray

by Chau Tu

This small ray can breach several feet into the air, causing a loud slapping sound upon its return to the ocean that has earned it the nickname “tortilla.”

devil rays, mobula rays, jumping, breaching, munk's devil ray, cabo pulmo, mexico, gulf of calilfornia, ocean
Jun. 05, 2014

Getting an Edge on Razors

by Mark Miodownik

An excerpt from Mark Miodownik's Stuff Matters.

Jun. 03, 2014

Picture of the Week: The Eye of the Sahara

by Chau Tu

The Richat Structure, or the “Eye of the Sahara,” can be seen from space and might be 100 million-years-old.

richat structure, dome, eye of the sahara, target, dome, michel jebrak
May. 29, 2014

What Our Stuff Says About Us

by Jennifer Ouellette

An excerpt from Me, Myself and Why.

jennifer ouellette, me myself and why, book, objects, stuff, facebook, identity
May. 28, 2014

Why Do Songs Get Stuck in Our Heads?

by Chau Tu

Why some tunes lodge in our brains isn’t so clear. Here are a few theories.

earworms, music, repetitive listening, song stuck in our heads
May. 22, 2014

Beware the Antibiotic Winter

by Martin Blaser

An excerpt from Missing Microbes: How the Overuse of Antibiotics Is Fueling Our Modern Plagues.

winter, antibiotic winter, obesity, modern plagues, obesity, autism
May. 21, 2014

10 Questions for George Church, Geneticist

by Jessica McDonald

The Harvard genetics professor talks DNA sequencing, raising extinct species from the dead, and going vegan.

May. 19, 2014

Picture of the Week: Kidney Stone

by Jessica McDonald

This otherworldly orb with purple projections comes from a surprising source: the urinary tract of its photographer.

kidney stone, wellcome images, wellcome image awards
May. 15, 2014

A Recipe for Invisible Ink

by Kristie Macrakis

An excerpt from Prisoners, Lovers & Spies: The Story of Invisible Ink from Herodotus to al-Qaeda.

May. 14, 2014

This Cryptocurrency Could Be an Answer to Bitcoin’s Privacy Problems

by Morgen Peck

A new cryptocurrency in development called ZeroCash claims to preserve its users’ anonymity. Here’s how it works.

May. 13, 2014

Picture of the Week: This Bee Buzzes for Blueberries

by Andrew P. Han

This metallic beauty is one of an estimated 4,000 bees native to the U.S., hundreds of which haven’t been scientifically named yet.

bees, native bees, honeybees, blueberry, maine blueberry bee, sam droege, usgs bee inventory
May. 09, 2014

Why Are Elephant Ears So Big? And Other Pachyderm Questions

by Julie Leibach

Research scientist Joseph Soltis answers your elephant-related queries.

May. 08, 2014

Why Do We Find Things Funny?

by Scott Weems

An excerpt from Ha! The Science of When We Laugh and Why.

humor, why do we laugh, laughter, aristotle, freud, haha
May. 05, 2014

Picture of the Week: Whale Graveyard

by Jessica McDonald

Paleontologists have pieced together clues to solve the mystery behind the largest collection of whale fossils ever found.

whale graveyard, whales, balleen
May. 01, 2014

A Recipe for the Forager in You: Braised Beef, Dandelion Leaves, and Clear Noodles

by Tama Matsuoka Wong

A recipe from Tama Matsuoka Wong, using foraged ingredients.

daniel, foraging, foraged foods, dandelions, beef, clear noodles, recipe, recipes
Apr. 30, 2014

These Infographics Show 'The Way to Go'

by Annie Minoff

When it comes to explaining how modern transportation infrastructure works, Kate Ascher prefers to show, not tell.

transportation, kate ascher, space, international space station, container ships
Apr. 28, 2014

Picture of the Week: Llareta

by Chau Tu

This hard-as-a-rock South American cushion plant can live thousands of years.

llatera, plant, bolivia, andes, peru, chile, oldest plant, catherine kleier, cath kleier, philip rundel
Apr. 24, 2014

Farewell to Ice Skating

by Richard B. Primack

An excerpt from Walden Warming.

walden pond, henry thoreau, ice skating, Richard B. Primack
Apr. 21, 2014

Picture of the Week: Buckeye Dragon Mite

by Jessica McDonald

A newly discovered mite from Ohio is reminiscent of the caterpillar-like dragons of Chinese New Year’s fame.

mite, dragon mite, osu, ohio state university, arachnid
Apr. 18, 2014

An Unexplored Island in Mozambique

by Edward O. Wilson

An excerpt from A Window on Eternity.

e.o. wilson, gorongosa national park, africa
Apr. 17, 2014

The Sounds of Space, in Indie Music

by Chau Tu

A new compilation of indie rock music includes sounds collected from the Voyager space missions.

Apr. 17, 2014

The Birth of New Atheism

by Amir Aczel

An excerpt from Amir Aczel's book "Why Science Does Not Disprove God."

Apr. 15, 2014

Picture of the Week: Practice Eye

by Julie Leibach

The instrument is an early version of a training device popularized by optometrists.

Apr. 10, 2014

A Whale Is Born

by Jean Craighead George

An excerpt from Jean Craighead George's Ice Whale.

Apr. 09, 2014

Yogurt, Breakfast of Champions?

by Jordan Davidson

Research suggests that yogurt containing active bacterial cultures could have multiple health benefits.

yogurt, probiotics, probiotic, greek yogurt, microbiome, microbiota, gut flora
Apr. 07, 2014

Picture of the Week: Gecko-Inspired Adhesive

by Jessica McDonald

A reusable tape made of micro fibers has the remarkable ability to self-clean.

gecko, sticky, adhesive, biomimicry, bio-inspired engineering, tape, scotch tape
Apr. 04, 2014

SciArts Spotlight: Brandon Ballengée

by Annie Minoff

Artist Brandon Ballengée’s portraits of deformed frogs turn scientific specimens into “stained glass windows.”

art, frogs, deformed frogs, brandon ballengee, clearing and staining, biology, amphibians
Mar. 26, 2014

Robot Roundup

by Jordan Davidson

From personal assisting, to search and rescue operations, to laparoscopic surgery, robots are becoming an ever-growing part of human life.

robot, cloud robotics, surgery, da vinci surgical system, raven, robotmaid, cheetah
Mar. 24, 2014

Picture of the Week: Sea Sponge

by Jessica McDonald

This sea sponge challenges a popular idea of what triggered the evolution of animal life on earth.

sea sponge, oxygen, evolution
Mar. 19, 2014

10 Questions for Walter Robinson, Polar Vortex Pioneer

by Andrew P. Han

Don't blame the polar vortex for this winter's cold weather woes.

polar vortex, weather, meteorology, antarctica, walter robinson, cold snap, frigid, winter, climate change
Mar. 17, 2014

What's the Cosmic Microwave Background?

by Julie Leibach

The universe's oldest light is one of the great pieces of evidence for the Big Bang.

cmb, cosmic inflation
Mar. 14, 2014

Ladies and Gentlemen, We Have a Winner

by Annie Minoff

Kai Sander's photograph of a snowy cornfield was the audience favorite in SciFri's Winter Nature Photo Contest.

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