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Sep. 19, 2014

Solve the Science Friday Crossword Puzzle!

by Chau Tu

Test your Science Friday knowledge with this crossword puzzle challenge by constructor Fred Piscop.

crossword, puzzle
Sep. 16, 2014

Picture of the Week: American Avocets

by Susan Cosier

As the climate changes, this species could lose ground in its breeding range but gain wintering ground.

climate change, birds, audubon, climate report, rosalie winard
Sep. 12, 2014

Are Generics the Same As Brand Name Drugs?

by Jeremy A. Greene

An excerpt from Generic: The Unbranding of Modern Medicine, by Jeremy A. Greene.

generic, drugs, prescription, medicine
Sep. 08, 2014

Picture of the Week: ‘Sequined’ Spider

by Becca Cudmore

This spider, likely a member of the Thwaitesia genus, was photographed in Singapore.

spider, mirror spider, sequined spider
Sep. 04, 2014

Could You Hit a Baseball Pitched Near the Speed of Light?

by Randall Munroe

An excerpt from xkcd creator Randall Munroe's book, What If?

randall munroe, baseball, physics
Sep. 04, 2014

How Pinball Helps Explain Ways We Think and Learn

by Barbara Oakley

An excerpt from A Mind for Numbers by Barbara Oakley.

math, barbara oakley, brain
Sep. 03, 2014

Quiz: How Good Are You at Learning?

by Benedict Carey

A quiz from Benedict Carey, author of How We Learn.

brain, learning, benedict carey
Sep. 02, 2014

Picture of the Week: Prehistoric Leafcutter Bee Pupa

by Chau Tu

Discovered at La Brea Tar Pits, the pupa helps reveal clues to what the environment was like in Southern California during the Pleistocene Epoch.

tar pits, la brea, bee, leafcutter bee, john harris, anna holden
Aug. 27, 2014

What Can We Learn From On-Screen Psychopaths?

by Rachel Nuwer

Few psychopaths who terrorize the big screen could pass a reality check, but those who do can be used as teaching tools for aspiring psychiatrists.

Aug. 25, 2014

Picture of the Week: Great Bowerbird’s Bower

by Chau Tu

Male great bowerbirds build these structures strictly to attract females for mating.

bowerbirds, great bowerbird, australia, bower
Aug. 19, 2014

10 Questions for Biruté Mary Galdikas, Orangutan Expert

by Becca Cudmore

The primatologist chats about her adventures with the red ape, her affinity for the forest, and her advice to budding conservationists.

Aug. 18, 2014

Picture of the Week: Growing Starfish

by Emma Bryce

Biologists photograph the first days of a fiery orange starfish common to Brazil's rocky southern shores.

Aug. 15, 2014

A Savior in Soil

by Kristin Ohlson

An excerpt from Kristin Ohlson's book The Soil Will Save Us.

soil, carbon, global warming, kristin ohlson, agriculture
Aug. 15, 2014

Dune Discussion Question: Week #4

by Annie Minoff

The fourth and final discussion question for this summer's SciFri Book Club selection, Dune.

scifri book club, dune, frank herbert
Aug. 14, 2014

Secrets of the Sauce (and Other Edible Liquids)

by Ali Bouzari

Culinary scientist Ali Bouzari weighs in on the four ways to change the thickness of any sauce, soup, or liquid.

emulsion, sauce, soup, food, cooking, ali bouzari, culinary science
Aug. 13, 2014

Share Your Favorite 'Dune' Quote

by Annie Minoff

Record yourself reading your favorite quote from "Dune," and share it with SciFri.

dune, frank herbert
Aug. 13, 2014

Food Failures: Is Your Hot Sauce Up to Snuff?

by Brandon Echter

Use science to improve your latest spicy concoction.

hot sauce, food, food science, picante, spicy, Ali Bouzari
Aug. 11, 2014

Picture of the Week: Ugab River

by Andrew P. Han

This ephemeral river may only last a few days a year, but it’s life sustaining.

ugab river, ephemeral river, black rhino, rhinoceros
Aug. 08, 2014

Dune Discussion Question: Week #3

by Annie Minoff

The third discussion question for this summer's SciFri Book Club selection, Dune.

dune, arrakis, book club, discussion, earth, sci-fi
Aug. 08, 2014

Build Your Own Radio Telescope to Listen to Meteors

by Nicole Gugliucci

Even if it's cloudy or you can't get outside at night, you can still listen to the Perseid meteor shower using a simple FM radio setup or by building a radio telescope at home.

meteor shower, meteors, perseids, radio, radio telescope, satellite, diy, astronomy
Aug. 07, 2014

Getting Hooked on Forensic Pathology

by Judy Melinek

An excerpt from Working Stiff: Two Years, 262 Bodies, and the Making of a Medical Examiner, by Dr. Judy Melinek and T.J. Mitchell.

surgery, medical examiner, excerpt, judy melinek, pathology, forensics
Aug. 06, 2014

Medical Mystery: The Pink Eye of Death

by Brandon Echter

Can you solve this real-life medical mystery?

medical mystery, forensics, pathology, judy melinek, medical examiner
Aug. 05, 2014

Meet the 'Dune' Readers: Kim Stanley Robinson and Sara Imari Walker

by Annie Minoff

Sci-fi author Kim Stanley Robinson and astrobiologist and theoretical physicist Sara Imari Walker talk about returning to Frank Herbert’s Dune Planet.

book club, dune, kim stanley robinson, sara imari walker
Aug. 04, 2014

Picture of the Week: Mating Pandemonium in African Forest Elephants

by Becca Cudmore

A researcher uses thermal imaging to study elephant mating behavior.

elephants, thermal imaging, peter wrege, cornell elephant listening project
Aug. 01, 2014

‘Dune’ Pic: What’s this Mouse Got to Do With Paul Muad’Dib?

by Annie Minoff

Ecologist Ned Dochtermann explains why the kangaroo mouse makes a perfect namesake for Dune’s hero, Paul Muad’Dib.

Aug. 01, 2014

The Science of the Silver Screen

by Christian Skotte

Science Friday headed to the movies!

science friday, los angeles, live event
Aug. 01, 2014

'Dune' Discussion Question: Week #2

by Annie Minoff

The second discussion question for this summer's SciFri Book Club selection, Dune.

dune, astrobiology,
Jul. 31, 2014

Animals Can Suffer From Mental Illness, Too

by Laurel Braitman

An excerpt from Laurel Braitman's Animal Madness.

Jul. 30, 2014

What 'Dune' Art Says About Life on Earth

by Becca Cudmore

John Schoenherr's extraterrestrial illustrations piqued the curiosity of a well-known science journalist: Carl Zimmer.

dune, john Schoenherr, carl zimmer
Jul. 29, 2014

Picture of the Week: Galaxy Bonanza

by Becca Cudmore

Hubble's most recent photograph of the universe reveals more than 10,000 galaxies, including young ultraviolet ones.

hubble, space, starlight, ultraviolet, infrared, stars, galaxy, galaxies
Jul. 25, 2014

Dune Discussion Question: Week #1

by Annie Minoff

The first discussion question for this summer's SciFri Book Club selection, Dune.

Jul. 22, 2014

Picture of the Week: Io Moth Caterpillar

by Julie Leibach

This silk moth symbolizes National Moth Week, which has gone global.

moth week, national moth week, io moth, kenn kafuman, andrei sourakov, dave markowitz
Jul. 21, 2014

The SciFri Book Club Reads Dune

by Annie Minoff

This summer’s pick is a bona fide science fiction classic: Frank Herbert’s ecological epic Dune.

frank herbert, dune, scifri, scifri book club, sci-fi
Jul. 17, 2014

Sea, Temperature, CO2 Levels All Rise in 2013

by Ira Flatow

NOAA releases its State of the Climate Report for 2013.

global warming, climate change, CO2, earth, greenhouse gases, noaa
Jul. 14, 2014

Picture of the Week: Harlequin Bug Eggs

by Becca Cudmore

These tiny black-and-white cylinders each host a life-sucking insect.

stink bug, stinkbug, harlequin bug, insect, toxic, camouflage, glucosinolates
Jul. 10, 2014

You Don't Need ESP to Predict Behavior

by William Poundstone

An excerpt from William Poundstone's Rock Breaks Scissors.

esp, william poundstone, rock, paper, scissors
Jul. 08, 2014

Picture of the Week: Domed Land Snail

by Chau Tu

This tiny snail lives in one of the world’s deepest cave systems.

snail, domed land snail, croatia, tiny animal, shell, new species, cave
Jul. 07, 2014

Space Vs. Food: Whose Side Are You On?

by Danielle Dana

We're pitting two of our favorite topics against each other. Are you #TeamSpace or #TeamFood?

#TeamSpace #TeamFood Fundraising
Jul. 03, 2014

Sock Puppets on Steroids: The Internet's Fake Personalities

by Charles Seife

An excerpt from Virtual Unreality: Just Because The Internet Told You, How Do You Know It’s True?

Jul. 03, 2014

Picture of the Week: Kawah Ijen Volcano

by Chau Tu

This Indonesian volcano burns blue at night, but that’s not lava you’re seeing.

volcano, crater lake, kawah ijen, sulfur, sulfuric acid, miners, indonesia
Jun. 27, 2014

Goodies From #CephalopodWeek

by Brandon Echter

For the past week, Science Friday’s Cephalopod Week has celebrated these amazing, beautiful, and mysterious creatures. We’ve compiled all the SciFri stories we shared this week in one place.

Jun. 25, 2014

Picture of the Week: Blue-Lined Octopus

by Julie Leibach

This venomous octopus packs a punch, but it’s more likely to hide than launch a poisonous attack.

julian finn, museum victoria, octopus
Jun. 19, 2014

Chinook Salmon Could Make Splashy Return

by Becca Cudmore

Some scientists predict that record numbers of fall Chinook will return to the Columbia River Basin this year.

salmon, chinook, fall chinook, bounty, pacific northwest, oregon
Jun. 18, 2014

On the Oregon Truffle Scent

by Julie Leibach

Oregon leads the country in commercial truffle production, boasting several native culinary varieties. And the best way to find them is to enlist the help of man’s best friend.

truffles, oregon, fungi, oregon truffle, dogs, umami truffle dogs
Jun. 17, 2014

Fighting the Machines

by Daniel Wilson

An excerpt from Daniel Wilson's new novel, Robogenesis.

robots, fiction, war, daniel wilson, science fiction, sci fi, robogenesis
Jun. 12, 2014

Proving Dad's Worth (With Science)

by Paul Raeburn

An excerpt from Do Fathers Matter?

fathers, paul raeburn, dads, family
May. 08, 2014

Alan Friedman, We Will Miss You

by Ira Flatow

The former director of the New York Hall of Science was a champion for the public's understanding of and involvement with science.

Jun. 09, 2014

Picture of the Week: Munk's Devil Ray

by Chau Tu

This small ray can breach several feet into the air, causing a loud slapping sound upon its return to the ocean that has earned it the nickname “tortilla.”

devil rays, mobula rays, jumping, breaching, munk's devil ray, cabo pulmo, mexico, gulf of calilfornia, ocean
Jun. 05, 2014

Getting an Edge on Razors

by Mark Miodownik

An excerpt from Mark Miodownik's Stuff Matters.

Jun. 03, 2014

Picture of the Week: The Eye of the Sahara

by Chau Tu

The Richat Structure, or the “Eye of the Sahara,” can be seen from space and might be 100 million-years-old.

richat structure, dome, eye of the sahara, target, dome, michel jebrak

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