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Apr. 18, 2014

An Unexplored Island in Mozambique

by Edward O. Wilson

An excerpt from A Window on Eternity.

e.o. wilson, gorongosa national park, africa
Apr. 17, 2014

The Sounds of Space, in Indie Music

by Chau Tu

A new compilation of indie rock music includes sounds collected from the Voyager space missions.

Apr. 17, 2014

The Birth of New Atheism

by Amir Aczel

An excerpt from Amir Aczel's book "Why Science Does Not Disprove God."

Apr. 15, 2014

Picture of the Week: Practice Eye

by Julie Leibach

The instrument is an early version of a training device popularized by optometrists.

Apr. 10, 2014

A Whale Is Born

by Jean Craighead George

An excerpt from Jean Craighead George's Ice Whale.

Apr. 09, 2014

Yogurt, Breakfast of Champions?

by Jordan Davidson

Research suggests that yogurt containing active bacterial cultures could have multiple health benefits.

yogurt, probiotics, probiotic, greek yogurt, microbiome, microbiota, gut flora
Apr. 07, 2014

Picture of the Week: Gecko-Inspired Adhesive

by Jessie McDonald

A reusable tape made of micro fibers has the remarkable ability to self-clean.

gecko, sticky, adhesive, biomimicry, bio-inspired engineering, tape, scotch tape
Apr. 04, 2014

SciArts Spotlight: Brandon Ballengée

by Annie Minoff

Artist Brandon Ballengée’s portraits of deformed frogs turn scientific specimens into “stained glass windows.”

art, frogs, deformed frogs, brandon ballengee, clearing and staining, biology, amphibians
Mar. 26, 2014

Robot Roundup

by Jordan Davidson

From personal assisting, to search and rescue operations, to laparoscopic surgery, robots are becoming an ever-growing part of human life.

robot, cloud robotics, surgery, da vinci surgical system, raven, robotmaid, cheetah
Mar. 24, 2014

Picture of the Week: Sea Sponge

by Jessie McDonald

This sea sponge challenges a popular idea of what triggered the evolution of animal life on earth.

sea sponge, oxygen, evolution
Mar. 19, 2014

10 Questions for Walter Robinson, Polar Vortex Pioneer

by Andrew P. Han

Don't blame the polar vortex for this winter's cold weather woes.

polar vortex, weather, meteorology, antarctica, walter robinson, cold snap, frigid, winter, climate change
Mar. 17, 2014

What's the Cosmic Microwave Background?

by Julie Leibach

The universe's oldest light is one of the great pieces of evidence for the Big Bang.

cmb, cosmic inflation
Mar. 14, 2014

Ladies and Gentlemen, We Have a Winner

by Annie Minoff

Kai Sander's photograph of a snowy cornfield was the audience favorite in SciFri's Winter Nature Photo Contest.

Mar. 12, 2014

Estimate Pi by Dropping Sticks

by Chau Tu

A simulator based on one of the oldest problems in geometrical probability approximates pi.

pi day, pi, 3.14, buffon's needle
Mar. 09, 2014

Dispatches from SXSW Interactive 2014

by SciFri Staff

SciFri is in Austin to check out the latest in innovation.

sxsw, interactive, sxsw interactive, austin
Mar. 08, 2014

How Scientists Are Learning to Read Our Minds

by Michio Kaku

An excerpt from "The Future of the Mind" by theoretical physicist Michio Kaku.

brain, telepathy, mind
Mar. 07, 2014

Picture of the Week: Utah Inversion

by Chau Tu

The Salt Lake Valley's topography lends itself to a natural phenomenon called an inversion, which traps air pollution.

utah, salt lake city, air, pollution, inversion, chemistry
Mar. 06, 2014

How to Make an Artificial Muscle Out of Fishing Line

by Carter S. Haines

You'll need fiber, some weights, a motor, and a heat gun to get you started.

Mar. 03, 2014

Pick the Winner of SciFri’s Winter Nature Photo Contest

by Annie Minoff

Time to choose your favorite winter snapshot out of our 10 finalists.

Feb. 28, 2014

Picture of the Week: Beer Bubbles

by Andrew P. Han

Scientists used a high speed camera to study how tiny carbon dioxide bubbles in beer rapidly expand and rise.

Feb. 27, 2014

For Privacy, Teens Use Encoded Messages Online

by danah boyd

This excerpt from "It's Complicated" explores how advances in technology afford teens new ways of communicating secretively.

teenagers, internet, privacy
Feb. 26, 2014

How Dogs Are Helping Us Understand Ourselves

by Becky Fogel

Dogs are helping improve our understanding of various human maladies and how we might treat them.

dogs, research, spina bifida, ocd, canine compulsive disorder, drug treatment, clinic, alcoholism, rehabilitation, mice
Feb. 21, 2014

How a London Sewer Inspired a Search for Unusual Sounds

by Trevor Cox

What might be considered a sound “defect” can be fascinating to listen to.

sounds, hearing
Feb. 21, 2014

Letting the Inner Athlete Shine, With a Techno-Boost

by Chau Tu

For Olympians, there’s interplay between natural athletic ability and suits that provide that extra edge.

technology, olympics, tech doping, doping, swimsuits, LZR racer, athlete, athletic ability, competition
Feb. 20, 2014

Getting to the Core of Olympic Curling Stones

by Julie Leibach

A small Scottish island is now the sole source of Olympic curling stone granite.

curling stones, olympics, granite, ailsa craig, island, common green, blue hone
Feb. 20, 2014

Meet John Weller, Our Winter Nature Photo Contest Judge

by Annie Minoff

This nature photographer is drawn to pictures that capture a subject's essence and tell a story.

Feb. 19, 2014

The Internet's Dark Side, Exposed in Three New Films

by Annie Minoff

Three documentaries raise important questions about Internet use, from its effect on our personal relationships to our right to access information.

internet, gaming, gaming addiction, aaron swartz, the internet's own boy, love child, web junkies, online access, online rights, web, wargames, world of warcraft
Feb. 14, 2014

Picture of the Week: Nanoparticle Heart

by Jessie McDonald

This heart-shaped nanoparticle contains a trio of elements that helps drive the oxidation of ethanol in fuel cells.

fuel cell, hydrogen, ethanol, valentine's day
Feb. 13, 2014

How to Get Stranded on Mars

by Andy Weir

An excerpt from the new novel, "The Martian."

mars, martian, novel, andy weir
Feb. 10, 2014

Seeing (and Feeling) the Future of Virtual Reality With the Oculus Rift

by Chau Tu

SciFri tests out the cutting-edge virtual reality device at this year’s Sundance Film Festival.

oculus rift, virtual reality, gaming, presence, rift
Feb. 07, 2014

Vote in SciFri's Winter Nature Photo Contest

by Annie Minoff

Vote for your favorite winter snapshot in the contest.

Jan. 31, 2014

The New Frontiers of Filmmaking, at Sundance

by Chau Tu

This year, the Sundance Film Festival's New Frontier exhibition explored humanity's evolving relationship with technology.

Jan. 29, 2014

10 Questions for Jill Tarter, Astronomer

by Susan Cosier

The long-time SETI astronomer discusses the search for extraterrestrial intelligence and helping inspire a Carl Sagan novel.

jill tarter, carl sagan, contact, seti, et, search for extraterrestrial intelligence
Jan. 24, 2014

A Novelist Inspired by Physicist-Muses

by Sara Paretsky

Author Sara Paretsky describes the scientific influences on her new crime detective novel, Critical Mass.

sara paretsky, albert einstein, physics, marietta blau, jew, jewish, nazi, Radium Research Institute in Vienna, Austria
Jan. 24, 2014

A Physicist Conjures Sounds From the Past

by Andrew P. Han

Physicist Carl Haber helps resurrect sound from old audio files once thought lost to history.

carl haber, alexander graham bell, pete seager, the weavers, music, audio files, national museum of american history, audio preservation, macarthur genius grant
Jan. 21, 2014

Dispatches From Sundance

by SciFri Staff

SciFri staff members are checking in on the Sundance Film Festival's science offerings.

sundance, sundance film festival, new frontier
Jan. 17, 2014

Why We Should Think Big

by Max Tegmark

MIT physics professor Max Tegmark discusses how mathematics is integrated into every part of our universe.

Jan. 17, 2014

Picture of the Week: Biofluorescing Fish

by Chau Tu

Researchers have discovered an unprecedented diversity of glowing fish species.

biofluorescing, biofluorescence, fish, john sparks, glowing, gfp
Jan. 16, 2014

The Anxiety Riddle

by Scott Stossel

An excerpt from My Age of Anxiety.

scott stossel, anxiety, worry, fear, panic
Jan. 10, 2014

What Is Kraut-chi?

by Sandor Ellix Katz

Fermentation experimentalist Sandor Ellix Katz describes his hybrid sauerkraut-kimchi dish, and offers a few fermentation tips.

sauerkraut, kimchi, recipe, food
Jan. 09, 2014

Picture of the Week: Angiosperm in Amber

by Julie Leibach

A recently described 100 million-year-old fossil is the most complete flowering plant from the Cretaceous discovered.

amber, cretaceous, angiosperm, pollen, germinate, pollen tube
Jan. 07, 2014

Ice Spikes: Your Photos

by Chau Tu

We asked you to submit your own photos of the ice spike phenomenon.

ice spike, ice, photography, frozen water,
Jan. 03, 2014

Iowa Going Green: What Does It Mean for 2016?

by Ira Flatow

Could new wind energy projects influence votes?

Jan. 03, 2014

A Grasshopper Storm, a Mental Shift

by Jeffrey Lockwood

Humans' perception of insects is deeply rooted in our evolutionary past.

grasshoppers, the infested mind, swarm, jeffrey lockwood
Jan. 03, 2014

Picture of the Week: Ice Spike

by Chau Tu

One experiment shows that this little understood phenomenon seems to perform better with distilled water.

ice spikes, freezing, ice, frozen water, ice cubes
Dec. 20, 2013

Picture of the Week: Christmas Tree Farm

by Andrew P. Han

The country's Christmas tree capital is Oregon, where Douglas and noble firs reign thanks to accommodating climate and soil.

christmas trees, tree farms, oregon, tree, douglas fir, noble fir
Dec. 13, 2013

Holiday Gift Idea: Offbeat Science Books

by Annie Minoff

From Rube Goldberg devices to jet packs, these books cover subjects that won't disappoint.

books, holiday, christmas, gifts, presents, science books
Dec. 12, 2013

The Miracle Drug You Need to Take

by Jordan D. Metzl

There's one simple thing you can start doing today to extend your life.

exercise, the exercise cure, fitness, jordan d. metzl, health
Dec. 12, 2013

Picture of the Week: Geminid Meteor Shower

by Julie Leibach

Evidence suggests that these fireballs don't come from a comet, but an asteroid with a tail.

geminids, meteor shower, comet, asteroid, phaethon 3200, dave jewitt, dean regas, Cincinnati observatory
Dec. 09, 2013

Fritz Kahn’s Fantastical Journey Through the Body

by Annie Minoff

The German graphic designer was a pioneer of popular science communication, using familiar objects as metaphors for biological processes.

fritz kahn, woody allen, sex, body, cell, journey, Uta von Debschitz

To access older blog posts, navigate via the archive links in the sidebar at left.

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