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Dec. 23, 2014

Give a Little, Get a Lot

by Ira Flatow

Make a donation to help support Science Friday's programming into 2015.

end of year, donation, donate
Dec. 22, 2014

Picture of the Week: Transgenic American Chestnuts

by Chau Tu

Researchers have developed a blight-resistant species that's nearly identical to the American chestnut tree.

chestnuts, genetic engineering, american chestnut, blight, restoration, transgenic trees
Dec. 17, 2014

Picture of the Week: Mechanical Calculator

by Sarah Lewin

This machine was a predecessor to the electronic calculator.

calculator, mechanical calculator, kevin twomey, mark glusker
Dec. 17, 2014

SciFri Book Club: Vote for a Book to Beat the Winter Blues

by Annie Minoff

Help the SciFri Book Club pick its next book.

book club
Dec. 12, 2014

Five Books Guaranteed to Make Kids Love Science

by Rachel Poliquin

These kids’ books spark science curiosity with playful illustrations and facts to match.

kids books, science books
Dec. 12, 2014

Recipe: Jeff Potter’s Patent-Violating* Chocolate Chip Cookies

by Jeff Potter

How to make cookies that stay chewy on the inside with crispy outer edges.

baking, cookies
Dec. 11, 2014

Picture of the Week: Underwater Robot

by Julie Leibach

Using data from a robot, scientists have created the first detailed, 3-D maps of Antarctic sea ice thickness.

Dec. 11, 2014

Why I Riffed on Orion

by Ira Flatow

If you really want a space mission to happen, you’ve got to do more than hope. You’ve got to sit down and seriously plan like they did in the ’60s.

Dec. 11, 2014

Beyond the Butter: Twists on the Same Ol' Ingredients

by Sarah Lewin

Two foodies offer baking ingredient twists—and scientific insight into why they work.

food, baking, christmas, holiday, cookies, bread, butter, eggs, flour, sugar
Dec. 04, 2014

Seals Deep Dive for Ocean Data

by Chris Benjamin

Seals sporting telemetry tags are providing scientists with data on the ocean environment.

seals, climate change, antarctic, environment
Dec. 02, 2014

Picture of the Week: Livingstone's Beetles

by Emma Bryce

A museum curator has discovered a box of beetles containing specimens collected during a famous expedition.

beetles, livingstone, david livingstone, dr. livingstone i presume
Nov. 27, 2014

How a Bohemian Engineer Helped Blend Art and Science

by Arthur I. Miller

An excerpt from Arthur I. Miller's new book, Colliding Worlds.

billy kluver, engineer, contemporary art
Nov. 25, 2014

Picture of the Week: Cranberries

by Chau Tu

Some tasty facts about the popular Thanksgiving treat.

cranberries, thanksgiving, cranberry, cranberry station, university of massachusetts
Nov. 21, 2014

Truth, Educated Guesses, and Speculations in 'Interstellar'

by Kip Thorne

An excerpt from The Science of Interstellar, a new book by Kip Thorne.

interstellar, physics, space, kip thorne
Nov. 20, 2014

Q&A With Emily Graslie

by Chau Tu

More with the Field Museum's Chief Curiosity Correspondent and host of the “The Brain Scoop” on YouTube.

emily graslie, science communication, field museum, museum, youtube, video
Nov. 19, 2014

Green Politics

by Ira Flatow

How will the midterm election results, climate change "debate," and trends in renewable energy affect the 2016 election?

Nov. 18, 2014

Picture of the Week: Awareness in a Damaged Brain

by Emma Bryce

While people in a vegetative state appear physically unresponsive, a new study reveals that some might be aware to a degree.

Nov. 13, 2014

From Antlers to Tusks: Our Obsession With Extreme Animal Weapons

by Douglas J. Emlen

An excerpt from Animal Weapons, a book by Douglas Emlen.

animals, animal weapons, antlers, douglas emlen
Nov. 13, 2014

How to Build a Dinosaur

by Julie Leibach

The puppets in the live stage production Walking With Dinosaurs evoke a convincing "dino-ness."

Nov. 13, 2014

Where Do We Go From Here? Environmentalism, at a Crossroads

by James Gustave Speth

An excerpt from James Gustave Speth's memoir Angels by the River.

environment, policy, climate change, james gustave speth
Nov. 11, 2014

Picture of the Week: 'Engagement Ring' in Space

by Chau Tu

A nebula and a star line up perfectly in the sky.

nebula, abell 33, star, white dwarf
Nov. 06, 2014

10 Questions for Allen Bard, Father of Modern Electrochemistry

by Erika Beras

Allen Bard might be known for pioneering research in electrochemiluminescence, among other contributions to science, but he counts his students as his proudest achievement.

allen bard, electrochemistry, photoelectrochemistry, solar energy
Nov. 03, 2014

Picture of the Week: Death Under Glass

by Chau Tu

An exhibit at Philadelphia's Mütter Museum offers a peek through a forensic pathologist’s microscope.

histology, death, tattoo, forensic pathology, medical examination, skin
Oct. 28, 2014

Picture of the Week: Egyptian Mummy

by Sarah Lewin

A patient more than 3,000 years-old takes a turn through a CT scanner.

mummy, mummies, st. louis art museum, radiology
Oct. 24, 2014

How Innovation Happens in the Digital Age

by Walter Isaacson

An excerpt from Walter Isaacson's The Innovators.

walter isaacson, innovation, ideas
Oct. 23, 2014

#ObserveEverything…Including the Cat

by Annie Minoff

In the book Lost Cat, two feline fans reveal how methodical observation and GPS technology helped solve a kitty mystery.

cat, tracking, cat tracking, kitty, lost cat, rescue, gps
Oct. 20, 2014

Picture of the Week: Phytoplankton

by Sarah Lewin

This hard-scaled algae adapted to increased temperatures and acidification of the water—and continued absorbing CO2.

algae, phytoplankton, climate change, nature climate change, emiliani huxleyi
Oct. 17, 2014

Live From South Bend, Indiana

by Christian Skotte

Video from Science Friday's live show at the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana.

south bend, remote broadcast, indiana, notre dame
Oct. 16, 2014

A Jaguar Needs a Root Canal? The Dentist Is In

by Sue Russell

Veterinary dentist Brook Niemiec treats an arc of animals, from man’s best friend to lions, tigers, and bears.

Oct. 15, 2014

Picture of the Week: The Sun

by Sarah Lewin

Photographer Alan Friedman documents the sun’s many faces using telescopes, filters, cameras, and computer software.

Oct. 09, 2014

Facing Mortality, As a Doctor

by Atul Gawande

An excerpt from Atul Gawande's Being Mortal.

atul gawande, death, mortality, doctor
Oct. 06, 2014

Picture of the Week: Fukang Pallasite

by Chau Tu

This rare type of meteorite offers insight into asteroid formation, as well as earth's geologic processes.

pallasite, fukang, meteorite
Oct. 02, 2014

Is MSG Bad for Your Health?

by Chau Tu

Monosodium glutamate has gotten a bad rap for causing allergies, but is it justified?

msg, monosodium glutamate, health, food additive, umami
Sep. 30, 2014

Picture of the Week: Mammalian Eye

by Emma Bryce

A special imaging technology peers inside a mouse eye, revealing the distinct roles that cells play in maintaining retinal health.

eye, mouse, cells
Sep. 26, 2014

A Doctor's First Night On Call

by Terrence Holt

An excerpt from Internal Medicine by Terrence Holt.

medicine, hospital, doctor, patient
Sep. 26, 2014

The Science Friday Crossword Puzzle, Solved

by Julie Leibach

Find out the answers—and backstories—to the SciFri-themed crossword puzzle.

Sep. 26, 2014

Who’s Got the Biscotti? Mingling at the Ig Nobel Awards After-Party

by Carmen Nobel

The man of the hour is an octogenarian who claims more than 3,500 patents.

Sep. 25, 2014

Picking Up Where We Left Off

by Neal Stephenson

An excerpt from Neal Stephenson's story in Hieroglyph: Stories and Visions For a Better Future.

science fiction
Sep. 25, 2014

Art Bots and Talking Blenders: A Stroll Through Ars Electronica

by Annie Minoff

Every September, the Ars Electronica Festival draws artists, scientists, and technologists to Linz, Austria, to swap ideas and show off cutting-edge artworks.

ars electronica, art, technology
Sep. 22, 2014

Picture of the Week: Fused Staghorn Coral

by Chau Tu

This hybrid coral could withstand climate change better than its relatives.

coral, florida, miami, hybrid, ocean, environment
Sep. 19, 2014

Inside the Box: Crossword Puzzle Constructing in the Computer Age

by Julie Leibach

Computer software and word databases are changing the crossword puzzle game.

Sep. 19, 2014

Solve the Science Friday Crossword Puzzle!

by Chau Tu

Test your Science Friday knowledge with this crossword puzzle challenge by constructor Fred Piscop.

crossword, puzzle
Sep. 19, 2014

Forays Into the World of Fungi

by Eugenia Bone

An excerpt from Mycophilia, by Eugenia Bone.

mushrooms, fungi, foraging, sickness,
Sep. 19, 2014

The Business of Surgery: Has Love Been Lost?

by Paul Ruggieri

An excerpt from The Cost of Cutting by Paul Ruggieri.

healthcare, medicine, money
Sep. 16, 2014

Picture of the Week: American Avocets

by Susan Cosier

As the climate changes, this species could lose ground in its breeding range but gain wintering ground.

climate change, birds, audubon, climate report, rosalie winard
Sep. 12, 2014

Are Generics the Same As Brand Name Drugs?

by Jeremy A. Greene

An excerpt from Generic: The Unbranding of Modern Medicine, by Jeremy A. Greene.

generic, drugs, prescription, medicine
Sep. 08, 2014

Picture of the Week: ‘Sequined’ Spider

by Becca Cudmore

This spider, likely a member of the Thwaitesia genus, was photographed in Singapore.

spider, mirror spider, sequined spider
Sep. 04, 2014

Could You Hit a Baseball Pitched Near the Speed of Light?

by Randall Munroe

An excerpt from xkcd creator Randall Munroe's book, What If?

randall munroe, baseball, physics
Sep. 04, 2014

How Pinball Helps Explain Ways We Think and Learn

by Barbara Oakley

An excerpt from A Mind for Numbers by Barbara Oakley.

math, barbara oakley, brain
Sep. 03, 2014

Quiz: How Good Are You at Learning?

by Benedict Carey

A quiz from Benedict Carey, author of How We Learn.

brain, learning, benedict carey

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