Archive
2013
January
February
March
2012
January
February
May
June
July
August
September
October
2011
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2010
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December
2009
January
March
April
July
August
September
November
December
2008
July
August
September
November
Mar. 07, 2013

The Future of Women's History

by The Bug Chicks

We may never make history, but each week we teach young women who could, particularly in the sciences.

careers, science, women, bravery, insects, workshops, Women's History Month, St. Mary's Academy
Mar. 07, 2013

Don't Miss This Comet!

by Ira Flatow

Visible With the Naked Eye

comet, PANSTARR, space, astronomy
Feb. 20, 2013

Open Invitation to Lamar Smith, House Science Committee Chairman: Accepted

by Ira Flatow

Science Friday invites Chairman Lamar Smith to discuss technology that will track objects such as asteroids that threaten Earth.

asteroid 2012 DA14, Lamar Smith, House Science Committee, House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, Russia, meteor, Russian meteor, asteroid, asteroids, deflecting asteroid
Feb. 12, 2013

Battle of the Electric Cars: "Hydrogen Sucks," Says Elon Musk

by Ira Flatow

War of the Currents Redux: Fuel Cells vs Batteries

elon musk; Tesla; batteries; fuel cells; cars; hydrogen fuel; hydrogen; Edison; Westinghouse; current wars
Jan. 29, 2013

Flatow File: Spider Webs, Tractor Beams, and Beer

by Ira Flatow

This week, I'm focusing on some really geeky -- I should say Benjie* -- research that caught my eye. Be ready for some gorgeous graphics and hi-tech talk.

Star Trek, Physics, Spider
Jan. 22, 2013

Flatow File: Water on Mars, Sea Creatures, NFL Concussions

by Ira Flatow

Once more, lots of intriguing stories making the news this week. Here are a few of my favorites.

Oct. 15, 2012

Frosted Flowers: The Complexity of Climate Change in the Rocky Mountains

by Kara Rogers

Like many other species of subalpine and alpine wildflowers, each year, as the winter snowpack recedes, the glacier lily comes to life, sprouting leaves and flowers as soon as conditions are favorable and taking advantage of every moment of the short growing season.

rocky mountains, wildflowers, climate change, frost damage, glacier lily, aspen sunflower
Oct. 03, 2012

Tarantula ICU

by The Bug Chicks

When a tarantula is sick and weak, what do you do? Stick it in the ICU!

tarantula, care, icu, pets, spider, bug chicks,
Sep. 27, 2012

Rover Finds Ancient Stream Bed on Mars

by Ira Flatow

NASA's rover has discovered an ancient stream bed on Mars.

mars, mars rover, curiosity, space, space exploration, water on mars
Sep. 14, 2012

Record Breaking Planet

by Lisa Gardiner

Climate is defined as an average of thirty years of weather data. It is the norm, the average, what’s expected. When our planet’s climate veers from what’s expected, when a record is set, the question is – why?

climate change, sea ice, record temperatures, global warming, sea ice
Sep. 12, 2012

Insectivus for the Rest of Us

by The Bug Chicks

For bug lovers, there are lots of cool events happening all over the country.

bugs, insects, festivals, insect festival, bug celebration, EntoBlitz, Bug Bowl
Sep. 11, 2012

Meet the Strandbeests

by Leslie Taylor

Meet Animaris gubernare and Animaris adulari, two of kinetic sculptor Theo Jansen's strandbeests.

Theo Jansen, strandbeests, kinetic sculpture, sculpture, visual art, art
Sep. 11, 2012

See Ya, Sea Ice.

by Lisa Gardiner

This autumn, new records are being set for the minimum amount of sea ice in the Arctic. On August 26, the extent of ice diminished to less than it has ever been -- at least in the 30 years we've been watching it with satellites.

climate change, arctic, sea ice, global warming, arctic ocean, arctic ice melt
Sep. 10, 2012

Foresight in the Arctic: Predation and Preservation

by Kara Rogers

Do Arctic wolves use cooperative hunting strategies?

nature, wolves, wolf, global warming, arctic, climate change, sea ice, musk ox, carbon dioxide
Sep. 05, 2012

Insectos en Español? Que fantástico!

by The Bug Chicks

Learn about the yucca moth and the yucca plant and why pollinators are so important. In English and Spanish!

insects, bugs, pollinators, pollination, mutualism, yucca moth, yucca moth
Sep. 04, 2012

3D Mars Curiosity Photo

by Ira Flatow

Mars, Curiosity, 3D, Rover,
Sep. 04, 2012

Delmarva Peninsula's Endangered Squirrel

by Kara Rogers

The Delmarva fox squirrel is a very, very large squirrel. It can tip the scales at as many as three pounds.

squirrels, animals, endangered species, nature, gray squirrel
Aug. 29, 2012

Insects and Human Society: Webspinners

by The Bug Chicks

You’ve probably all seen silk webbing in the ridges of tree bark. It could be a spider’s web, or it could’ve been made by the elusive and shy insects called webspinners in the Order Embiidina.

bugs, insects, entomology
Aug. 27, 2012

A Warbler Rises from the Ashes

by Kara Rogers

Down to just 167 singing males in 1987, the Kirtland's warbler population has rebounded, with 1,828 males counted in 2011. The species has risen, almost literally, like a phoenix from the ashes.

warbler, bird, nature, kirtland's warbler,
Aug. 22, 2012

Insect Collecting: Pan and Baited Traps

by The Bug Chicks

A few weeks ago we showed you how to make a piece of insect collecting equipment called a beat sheet. In this post, we’re going to add pan traps and baited traps to your DIY collecting tools.

bugs, insects, entomology, bug collecting, nature
Aug. 20, 2012

The Fabled Jackdaw

by Kara Rogers

The jackdaw's intelligence and curiosity perpetuate the bird's tendency to get into trouble.

birds, ornithology, nature, natural history, crows, jackdaw
Aug. 16, 2012

Hot Guys and Smelly Socks

by Danica McKellar

An excerpt from the book "Girls Get Curves" by Danica McKellar provides an introduction to logic and reasoning.

math, mathematics, math education, education, science education, girls, geometry
Aug. 15, 2012

Tricky Mister! Indirect Sperm Transfer in Primitive Hexapods

by The Bug Chicks

In this video, we teach about indirect sperm transfer behaviors of these arthropods, in a slightly different way than other entomologists. Our way involves costumes. And mustaches. Enjoy!

bugs, insects, silverfish, mating, animal behavior, sexual reproduction
Aug. 08, 2012

the tANTalizing touch

by The Bug Chicks

This podcast explores the tactile communication of ants and how they use touch to interact with their environment.

bugs, insects, nature, podcast, apps, senses, arthropod
Aug. 08, 2012

Mars Excitement: Back to the Future

by Ira Flatow

Curiosity Lander: Excitement Recalls Viking

Space Mars Curiosity Rover Exploration
Aug. 07, 2012

The Numbat: A Most Unusual Marsupial

by Kara Rogers

The numbat, aka the banded anteater, is a marsupial native to Australia.

nature, animals, Australia, numbat, marsupial
Jul. 30, 2012

Footprints on the Moon

by Ira Flatow

Space Apollo Moon Footprint
Jul. 25, 2012

Message in a Cornicle

by The Bug Chicks

Aphids produde an alarm pheromone to defend themselves against predation.

bugs, insects, pheromones, biochemistry, alarm pheromone, predation
Jul. 24, 2012

Life in the Street Canyon: The Role of Plants in Maintaining Air Quality

by Kara Rogers

Street canyons--narrow streets lined by buildings hundreds of feet tall--are unique to the urban landscape. But while their structure undoubtedly adds to the allure of cities, it also effectively traps pollutants emitted by vehicular traffic traversing the canyon floor, resulting in poor air quality.

nature, plants, botany, conservation, biodiversity, ecology, urban ecology, cities, air pollution, pollution
Jul. 17, 2012

The Contagious Nature of Yawning

by Kara Rogers

That we can “catch” yawns is in itself fascinating, but that we can’t catch them from just anyone -- that we are immune to the yawns of perfect strangers but highly susceptible to those of family members or friends -- makes this behavior all the more intriguing.

yawning, animal behavior, psychology, sociology, empathy, chimpanzees
Jul. 11, 2012

Amazing Insect Feats

by The Bug Chicks

Fleas can jump over 150 times their own body length. A house fly can beat its wings 200 times per second. How do these feats compare with those of other animals?

bugs, insects, locomotion, entomology, cockroaches, fleas
Jul. 10, 2012

Excerpts from "Out of Nature": Challenges Facing Biodiversity Conservation

by Kara Rogers

There are major hindrances to prioritizing biodiverse areas for conservation. Examples include determining the size of land area that must be set aside, which generally must be very large to ensure that ecosystems can maintain their functions, and determining the value of these places in economic terms.

nature, plants, botany, conservation, biodiversity, ecology, climate change
Jul. 05, 2012

First Shadow Of A Single Atom

by Ira Flatow

What does a single atom look like?

Physics atoms
Jul. 05, 2012

Top 5: Red-headed Mouse Spiders

by The Bug Chicks

For Kristie, this spider is #1 on her "Top 5 Spiders To See Down Under" list. Sadly, she missed it last year while traveling in NSW but we thought we'd share this photo and take the opportunity to teach about some of the cool morphological features these spiders and their relatives have.

spiders, bugs, insects, photography, natural history
Jul. 04, 2012

What Higgs Boson Evidence Looks Like

by Ira Flatow

Higgs Boson Physics
Jul. 03, 2012

Excerpt from "Out of Nature": The Role of Plants in Medicine

by Kara Rogers

The global value of plant-based medicines is most readily apparent in revenue generated from sales of over-the-counter herbal preparations. In 2005 more than $14 billion (USD) was spent on such remedies in China alone. In 2007 US citizens spent even more -- nearly $15 billion -- on over-the-counter natural products.

medicine, plants, ethnobotany, botany, plant-based medicines, books
Jun. 27, 2012

Teen to Teen: Talking with Intel STS Finalist Danielle Goldman

by Caitlin Gee

Caitlin Gee, a student at High Technology High School in Lincroft, New Jersey, interviews Danielle Goldman, a student from Bronx High School of Science, about her experiences in the Intel Science Talent Search competition.

teen to teen, teen scientist, Intel STS, science fair, STEM education, neuroscience
Jun. 27, 2012

Cultural Entomology: Cockroaches

by The Bug Chicks

Cockroaches get a bad rap. Just the word makes people “ew” and “ugh”. Even though only 10% of species are pests of humans, we tend to associate all of them with filth. This video explores the biology, morphology and mythology surrounding these misunderstood animals.

insects, cockroaches, roaches, entomology, bugs
Jun. 26, 2012

Mosquitoes Go With the Flow When Flying in the Rain

by Kara Rogers

mosquitos, insects, fluid dynamics, physics
Jun. 20, 2012

Bug Bytes: Chill Out

by The Bug Chicks

For this podcast, world renowned architect Mick Pearce joins us from Zimbabwe to talk about the design of the Eastgate Center in Harare. There are no electrical AC units in the building – instead, Pearce used termite mound structure as inspiration for the ventilation system!

bugs, insects, termites, convection, architecture
Jun. 20, 2012

It's 10:00 PM, Do You Know Where Your Face Is?

by Ira Flatow

Facebook buys facial recognition company. Facing up to the consequences.

Facial recognition, ethics, geek, Facebook, face.com
Jun. 14, 2012

DIY Insect Collecting: Beat Sheet

by The Bug Chicks

People always ask us how they can collect insects safely. Professional insect collecting equipment can be expensive, so we’ve decided to make a little DIY series about how to make your own insect collecting equipment on the cheap.

bugs, insects, insect collection, hands-on activities, for kids
Jun. 12, 2012

Epiphytes and the Hidden Biodiversity of Rainforests

by Kara Rogers

While epiphytes are defined by their growth on other plants, most commonly trees, they do not steal nutrients away from their hosts. Rather, they rely on specialized aerial root systems that absorb water and nutrients directly from the air.

botany, nature, plants, epiphytes, tropics, bromeliads, biodiversity
Jun. 12, 2012

The Bay of Fundy Tides

by Coastal Studies for Girls

One place where the tides have an extreme effect on the ecosystem is in the Bay of Fundy.

oceanography, marine science, tides, tidal ecosystems, Bay of Fundy, Gulf of Maine,
Jun. 07, 2012

Cultural Entomology: Walking Sticks

by The Bug Chicks

Call them what you want – stick insects, walking sticks or stick bugs – we call them masters of camouflage! Insects in the Order Phasmatodea look and behave like plants and hide from even the most intrepid entomologists. In this new video we created for Texas A&M University’s Department of Entomology, we take you through the morphology, biology and mythology of these fascinating creatures.

bugs, insects, walking sticks, entomology, sociology, anthropology, culture
Jun. 05, 2012

The Molecular Secrets of Turtles

by Kara Rogers

There are few animals in the world that share the morphological peculiarities of turtles, and the physical likenesses that do exist between these shelled wonders and other animals are so ambiguous as to be considered one of the last great obstacles to a more complete understanding of not only the turtle's evolutionary past but also the whole of vertebrate evolution.

evolution, genetics, turtles, genome, microRNA, animals, species
Jun. 05, 2012

Daisy Brittle Star

by Coastal Studies for Girls

Brittle stars are not like most sea stars when it comes to taking in and digesting food. Most sea stars extrude their stomachs to feed, but the brittle star cannot. The brittle star’s food is taken in to the mouth, through the stomach and absorbed along the alimentary canal as it has no intestines or anus. The waste then goes back out of the mouth.

brittle star, marine biology, invertebrates, ocean, sea life, starfish
May. 31, 2012

Mud

by Coastal Studies for Girls

A mud flat is always a fun place to work. You can get your hands dirty and surround yourself in the smell of decomposition. It is an environment that only true nature-lovers can appreciate. However, there is more to a mud flat than being smelly and dirty.

ecosystems, mud flat, intertidal, marine biology, ecology
May. 29, 2012

My Sister Species: The Common Eider

by Coastal Studies for Girls

Watching the Eiders along the coast of Maine, I have admired how they are able to dive below the surface of the water to capture their food thanks to their protective coat. The Common Eider eats mollusks, crustaceans, and even sea urchins!

biology, marine biology, animals, intertidal, ocean, marine science, ducks, eider, birds, birdinganimal behavior
May. 29, 2012

Lice Shed Light on Lemur Social Behavior

by Kara Rogers

The brown mouse lemur is one of the smallest primates in the world. It also has the distinction of being the only animal that is parasitized bya particular species of blood-sucking louse that recently found itself at the center of a scientific effort to map the social network of its elusive host.

lemur, madagascar, animal behavior, nature, animals, social biology, lice, insects, parasites, population, biology

To access older blog posts, navigate via the archive links in the sidebar at left.

BOOKS BY OUR GUESTS

PITCH A STORY

Got some science you want to share?

Science Friday® is produced by the Science Friday Initiative, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.

Science Friday® and SciFri® are registered service marks of Science Friday, Inc. Site design by Pentagram; engineering by Mediapolis.

 

topics