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Apr. 11, 2014

Bill Nye Stops By

Bill Nye stops by to chat about teaching science, launching solar sails into space, and more.

bill nye, planetary society, space, space literacy, evolution

Apr. 11, 2014

Busting Bad Bacteria With Their Viral Enemies

Phages added to packaged beef or spinach could cut down on E. coli bacteria outbreaks.

bacteriophages, e. coli, bacteria, viruses, beef, phages, spinach, paul ebner

Apr. 11, 2014

Up Close With the Lunar Eclipse

The lunar eclipse on Tuesday, April 15, will be visible from all over North and South America.

moon, eclipse, sun, lunar eclipse, astronomy, andrew fraknoi

Apr. 11, 2014

Scientists Study Vole Romance Under the Influence

To learn how alcohol affects relationships, scientists mix prairie voles a drink.

prairie vole, wine, tipsy, cocktail, drunk, vole

Apr. 11, 2014

Reawakening Limbs After Years of Paralysis

Paraplegics were able to stand and move their legs again with the help of a spinal implant.

brain, paralyzed, paralysis, susan harkema, roderic pettigrew, spine, paraplegic, electrical stimulation, implant

Apr. 11, 2014

With Her Kids' Help, Jean Craighead George’s ‘Ice Whale’ Sees Print

The final novel from My Side of the Mountain author Jean Craighead George takes children underneath the Arctic Ocean.

Apr. 04, 2014

How Will Russian-U.S. Politics Affect Our Relationship in Space?

NASA suspended a majority of its communications with Russia in response to the conflict in Crimea.

russia, space, crimea, nasa, international space station, marcia smith

Apr. 04, 2014

Sir Roger Penrose: Cosmic Inflation Is ‘Fantasy’

What's wrong with modern physics—and could alternative theories explain our observations of the universe?

roger penrose, physics, cosmic inflation, inflation, universe, big bang theory,

Apr. 04, 2014

Inside Insight: Clearing and Staining Fish

Clearing and staining gobies, stingrays, and sharks has revealed to scientist Adam Summers critical data, as well as the beauty of each fish’s unique form.

video, adam summers, clearning and staining, fish, biomechanics,

Apr. 04, 2014

Diving Into the Underground Ocean of One of Saturn’s Moons

Enceladus, one of Saturn’s moons, may have an underground ocean the size of Lake Superior.

enceladus, david stevenson, science, moon, underground ocean

Apr. 04, 2014

The Origins of Violence

An anthropologist, a psychologist, and a crime writer ask: Are humans hard-wired for violence?

steven pinker, harold schechter, richard wrangham, crime, violence

Mar. 28, 2014

Join the Science Club: Build an Art Machine

Your mission, should you choose to accept it: Build a machine that can make art.

science club, art machine, machine art, diy, project, maker, machine, art, project

Mar. 28, 2014

Robot Builders with Bugs for Brains

The bugs meet the bots in the world of swarm robotics.

biomimicry, termites, robots, scott turner, justin werfel, robotics

Mar. 28, 2014

The Wind Comes Sweeping Down the Plains—of Iowa

Texas and California dominate the U.S. in wind power generation—but Iowa isn't far behind.

wind, alternative energy, energy, iowa, durrie bouscaren, rock island clean line

Mar. 28, 2014

Racing Towards Hydrogen Fuel Cell Cars

Toyota plans to release a hydrogen fuel cell car in California by 2015.

toyota, fuel cell car, jack brouwer, national fuel cell research center, hydrogen technology, hydrogen fuel cell, hydrogen fuel cell car, hydrogen car

Mar. 28, 2014

Dwarf Planet Found at the Edge of the Solar System

Dwarf planet 2012 VP-113 takes approximately 4,000 years to orbit the sun once.

dwarf planet, solar system, oort cloud, chad trujillo

Mar. 28, 2014

Engineering Life Through Synthetic Biology

From designer yeast genomes to batteries made from bacteria, an update on synthetic biology.

synthetic biology, tim lu, jef boeke, yeast

Mar. 28, 2014

Movie Night for Scientists

Movie theaters and scientists pair up to present a National Evening of Science on Screen.

movies, science movies, national evening of science on screen, soylent green, avatar

Mar. 21, 2014

Detecting the ‘Bang’ from the Big Bang

Researchers detected waves coming just after the Big Bang 13.8 billion years ago.

billions, 14 billino, 13.8 billion, gravity waves, cosmic inflation, cosmic microwave background

Mar. 21, 2014

A Bird-Like ‘Chicken From Hell’ Dino Discovery

Anzu wyliei was a toothless, bird-like dinosaur that weighed 500 pounds.

matt lamanna, chicken from hell, dinosaur, big bird

Mar. 21, 2014

Digital Gets Physical

Students in MIT’s Tangible Media Group break down the barriers of graphic interfaces and allow users to touch and manipulate pixels in real life.

MIT, tangible media group, jamsheets, inform, interactive, display, digital, computer

Mar. 21, 2014

Food Failures: Knead-to-Know Science Behind Bread

America's Test Kitchen editorial director Jack Bishop talks about the science behind a perfect loaf.

bread, america's test kitchen, jack bishop, yeast, knead

Mar. 21, 2014

Sculpting Science

Paleo-artist John Gurche and paleoanthropologist Rick Potts discuss the intersection between art and science.

paleontologist, rick potts, john curche, smithsonian, hall of human origins

Mar. 21, 2014

Scientists Test What the Nose Knows

A new study claims the human nose can distinguish one trillion unique smells.

human smell, nose, detect, unique odors, rockefeller university

Mar. 14, 2014

Three Years After the Fukushima Nuclear Meltdown

Three out of the six reactors at the Fukushima Daichii nuclear power plant suffered a meltdown.

ieee spectrum, fukushima, daichii, fukushima daichii nuclear power plant, tsunami, eliza strickland, meltdown

Mar. 14, 2014

As the Web Turns 25, Where Is It Going Next?

We celebrate the web’s 25th birthday with an archival clip of Tim Berners-Lee, the web’s inventor, and take a look ahead with Lee Rainie of the Pew Research Center.

www, world wide web, internet project at the pew research center, lee rainie, sir tim berners-lee

Mar. 14, 2014

EncROACHment: New York’s Invasive Cockroaches

Rutgers University entomologists unravel clues to identify a new invasive roach species in New York City.

winter roach, roach, jamestown, rutgers, cockroach, insect

Mar. 14, 2014

Could a Blood Test Help Diagnose Alzheimer’s?

In a preliminary study, researchers identified 10 lipids in the blood that correlated with an increased risk for Alzheimer’s.

alzheimer's, nature medicine, blood test, lipids, howard federoff

Mar. 14, 2014

Celebrating Irrational, Transcendental Pi

As we celebrate Pi Day, mathematician Steven Strogatz talks about how the ancients calculated pi—and how you can do it at home.

mathematician, Steven Strogatz, pi, pi day, irrational number, greek number

Mar. 14, 2014

SciFri’s Winter Nature Photo Contest Winner...Revealed!

Winter Nature Photo Contest judge John Weller discusses your top shots.

winter nature photo contest, winter, nature, john weller, corn, cornfield, amateur photography, photography, tips, photo tips

Mar. 07, 2014

Battling HIV, Using a Body’s Own Immune Cells

Researchers are exploring a new approach to fighting HIV infection by genetically modifying a person’s own immune cells to be resistant to the virus.

hiv, aids, resistance, immune cells, gene therapy, anthony fauci, national institute of allergy and infectious diseases, new england journal of medicine

Mar. 07, 2014

Delving Into the Security of an Internet of Things

As more devices come online, is enough attention being given to security and privacy?

internet of things, bruce schneier, networked appliances, online, privacy, security, security flaw, security breach

Mar. 07, 2014

Where Do Sea Turtles Go During Their ‘Lost Years’?

Biologists crack the case of sea turtles’ “lost years” with a little help from a nail salon technician.

sea turtles, lost years, nail salon, nail acrylic, nail polish, loggerhead sea turtle, ocean

Mar. 07, 2014

Michio Kaku Imagines ‘The Future of the Mind’

In "The Future of the Mind," physicist Michio Kaku predicts big advances for our brains.

the future of the mind, michio kaku, brain, reality, future, science fiction

Mar. 07, 2014

‘Particle Fever’ Captures the Excitement of the Higgs Discovery

Particle Fever takes filmgoers behind the scenes of physics’ big breakthrough: the discovery of the Higgs Boson.

higgs boson, large hadron collider, cern, david kaplan, particle fever, search for the higgs boson, LHC

Feb. 28, 2014

On Social Media, the Kids Are All Right

In It’s Complicated, Internet scholar danah boyd debunks myths about teens’ online lives.

it's complicated, internet, danah boyd, internet, social media, teens, texting

Feb. 28, 2014

Your Brain on Jazz

Researcher and musician Charles Limb created an fMRI-safe keyboard to study the effects of jazz on the brain.

charles limb, brain, jazz, music, improvise, improvisation, jazz riff, musical conversation, communication

Feb. 28, 2014

This Fish Sucks

Adam Summers of the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Labs details how the northern clingfish takes the art of suction to new heights.

clingfish, suction, university of washington, friday harbor labs, adam summers

Feb. 28, 2014

A Diverse Energy Diet, to Face a Changing Climate

U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz talks about progress on President Obama’s “all-of-the-above” energy strategy.

ernest moniz, energy, renewables, solar thermal, solar, climate change, nuclear, natural gas, energy secretary

Feb. 28, 2014

Pulsar Pulverizes Incoming Asteroids

A pulsar 37,000 light-years from Earth collided with a billion-ton asteroid.

pulsar, astrophysical letters, asteroids, battle, ryan Shannon

Feb. 28, 2014

A 10,000-Year Stopover En Route to the New World

The ancestors of Native Americans may have lived for millennia on the Bering land bridge before fanning out across the Americas.

bering land bridge, asia, north america, science, john hoffecker

Feb. 28, 2014

Making Sense Out of Bitcoin

Bitcoin is a digital currency that was created by an anonymous developer in 2009.

bitcoin, morgan peck, developer, currency, virtual currency, banks, financial industry

Feb. 21, 2014

Artificial Muscles Flex Using Fishing Line and Thread

Researchers create superhuman strength from sewing thread and fishing line.

sewing thread, fishing line, muscles, super muscles, science, Ray Baughman, nanotech institute, university of texas, dallas, science

Feb. 21, 2014

Building an Open 'Internet of Things'

Will the 'Internet of Things' be open to developers—or hindered by proprietary smart boxes?

Neil Gershenfeld, scott jenson, google, internet of things, smart box, smart boxes, mit, internet, smart appliances

Feb. 21, 2014

App Chat: Social Media Gets Newsy

Ellis Hamburger, a reporter at The Verge, talks about why social media giants are betting on news.

paper, flipboard, circa, twitter, the verge, app, apps, news apps, social media, curation, news curation, newspaper

Feb. 21, 2014

Beneath a Sleeping Volcano, Magma Mush Lies in Wait

Despite what Hollywood might show you, there’s no big tank of liquid rock under a volcano. Stored magma spends most of its time as a crystalline mush.

volcano, magma, nature, geochemist, geoscience, lava, peanut butter, kari cooper

Feb. 21, 2014

The Science Behind the World’s Strangest Sounds

Acoustic engineer Trevor Cox recorded the world’s longest reverberation.

trevor cox, sound, acoustics, strange sounds, weird sounds

Feb. 21, 2014

Olympians Look to Science for a Competitive Edge

Physiologist and aerospace engineer Troy Flanagan shares the science behind Olympic training.

troy flanagan, science, olympics

Feb. 21, 2014

Can Technology Build a Better Athlete?

Will the next big Olympics competition be a race for more technology?

Mark McClusky, wired, bobsled, tech doping, technology, olympics

Feb. 14, 2014

Stem Cell Research Update

Researchers in a recent study report creating stem cells in 30 minutes through an acid bath.

stem cells, cell, evan snyder, nature, acid bath

Feb. 14, 2014

Solving Life’s Everyday Problems, With Data

Data geeks say our “digital breadcrumbs” can reveal where to eat, who to date, or which bus to take.

big data, alex sandy pentland, mit, digital breadcrumbs, hilary mason, max shron, bus routes, bus, smarphones, web browsers, cheeseburger, online dating

Feb. 14, 2014

Out of the Bottle: Wine Psychology

How do our expectations, environment, and social cues trick us into believing our wine tastes better or worse?

wine, psychology, psychology of wine, taste

Feb. 14, 2014

Scientists Hunt for Morning Dew on Mars

Could mysterious dark streaks on Martian slopes be evidence of liquid water flows?

dark flows, mars, water, morning dew, iron, liquid water, water on mars

Feb. 14, 2014

Andy Weir: ‘The Martian’

Andy Weir’s novel of Mars survival mixes science fact and fiction.

the martian, andy weir, stranded on mars, surviving on mars, living on mars

Feb. 14, 2014

In Wind Tunnels, Ski Jumpers Become Flying Machines

Wind tunnels help Olympic ski jumpers balance between lift and drag.

ski jump, lift, drag, ski jumping, aerodynamics

Feb. 14, 2014

For Some Olympians, Winning Medals Is All About Flow

Understanding fluid dynamics helps Olympians shave minutes off race times.

timothy wei, skeleton, skeleton race, fluid dynamics

Feb. 07, 2014

Greenland’s Fast-Moving Glacier Speeds Up

The Jakobshavn glacier reached speeds of more than 150 feet per day during the summer of 2012.

Jakobshavn glacier, greenland, ocean, sea level rice, fast glacier

Feb. 07, 2014

Meet Vermeer, the Engineer

A new documentary, Tim’s Vermeer, shows that the Dutch master painter was a tinkerer, too.

tim, vermeet, tim jenison, johannes vermeer

Feb. 07, 2014

What Pulled the Plug on the Bioluminescent Bay?

The glowing bioluminescent bay near Fajardo, Puerto Rico went dark for more than a week in November.

bioluminescence, fajardo bay, puerto rico, edith widder

Feb. 07, 2014

When Do Childhood Memories Start to Fade?

On average, adults’ earliest memories go back to the age of three.

memory, childhood amnesia, forgetfulness, patricia bauer, memories, forgetting

Feb. 07, 2014

Can Gaming Make Us More Social?

NYU's Katherine Isbister imagines a future where technology connects us to other people, not avatars.

gaming, user interface, avatar, video games, interaction, immersive

Feb. 07, 2014

Crafting the 'Fastest Ice on Earth'

Marc Norman obsessively monitors the ice at the Utah Olympic Oval to create the perfect skating surface.

ice, speed skating, utah, salt lake city, olympic oval

Feb. 07, 2014

Ice Science a Slippery Quandary for Physicists

Friction researcher and avid curler Robert Carpick discusses the tricky physics of ice.

ice, slippery, physics, meltwater, robert carpick

Jan. 31, 2014

Hotter Weather, Heavier Rains Threaten Penguins

Move over polar bears—could penguins be the new poster children for climate change?

penguins, climate change, polar bears, drought, heavy rain, rain, heat, hot, plos one, argentina, magellanic penguin

Jan. 31, 2014

Could There Be a Crisis in Physics?

Physicist Lawrence Krauss and Nobel Laureates Frank Wilczek and Brian Schmidt discuss current cosmic challenges.

physics, crisis in physics, higgs boson,

Jan. 31, 2014

At Sundance, Scientists and Screenwriters Are Judges

What makes science work on-screen? This year’s Sundance judges weigh in.

Jill Tarter, Kevin Hand, Jon Spaihts, park city, utah, sundance, sundance film festival, 2001: a space odyssey, movies, film, sci-fi, scifi

Jan. 31, 2014

Alan Alda’s Challenge to Scientists: Define Color

Alda's 'Flame Challenge' asks scientists to explain color—with children as the judges.

alan alda, flame challenge, what is a flame, what is color, color challenge, students

Jan. 24, 2014

Is Coding the Language of the Digital Age?

The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that programming jobs will grow by 12 percent from 2010 to 2020.

coding literacy, coding, programming, women, minorities

Jan. 24, 2014

Sara Paretsky: ‘Critical Mass’

In Critical Mass, a crime writer draws inspiration from an overlooked physics pioneer.

sara paretsky, critical mass, detective, Marietta Blau

Jan. 24, 2014

Star-Crossed Galaxies

What happens when two spiral galaxies collide?

galaxies, collision, collide, milky way, spiral galaxy

Jan. 24, 2014

A ‘Personal’ Computer Turns 30

On January 24, 1984, Steve Jobs unveiled the Macintosh computer to the world.

macintosh, steve jobs, steven levy, andy herzfeld, apple, coputer, apple macintosh anniversary

Jan. 24, 2014

James Dyson: ‘Failures Are Interesting’

Inventor James Dyson built 5,127 prototypes before completing his first bagless vacuum.

james dyson, bagless vacuum, inventor, diy
her, ai, a.i., artificial intelligence, her, joaquin phoenix, scarlett johansson

Jan. 17, 2014

Is the Universe Built on Math?

In The Mathematical Universe, physicist Max Tegmark argues that the universe is completely mathematical.

The Mathematical Universe: My Quest for the Ultimate Nature of Reality, physicist, Max Tegmark, cosmos, universe, reality

Jan. 17, 2014

Scott Stossel: My Age of Anxiety

An estimated one out of seven Americans suffers from anxiety.

anxiety, panic, disorders, scott stossel

Jan. 17, 2014

How Fins Gave Way to Feet

Tiktaalik roseae was a fish that had scales, gills, and limb-like front fins.

fossil, fins, legs, evolution, Tiktaalik roseae, fish

Jan. 17, 2014

Medicine's Gender Gap

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for American women. Yet women make up only a third of subjects in cardiovascular clinical trials.

women, cardiovascular health, clinical trials, cardiovascular disease, heart attacks

Jan. 10, 2014

Cold Snap Knocks Out Some Invasive Insects

Asian long-horned beetle, emerald ash borer: Will they survive the colder weather?

asian long-horned beetle, polar vortex, cold, winter, emerald ash-borer

Jan. 10, 2014

An Antarctic Expedition, Frozen in Time

Century-old Antarctic photos offer a peek into Shackleton’s ill-fated Ross Sea Party Expedition.

ross sea party, shackleton, lost at sea, ice, lost men

Jan. 10, 2014

Migraine Study Reveals the Power of Placebo

Patients’ expectations can play a role in the effectiveness of medications and placebos.

Ted Kaptchuk, migraine headaches, placebo, drug, migraines, headaches

Jan. 10, 2014

2014 Consumer Electronics Show Round-Up

Chris Ziegler of The Verge discusses technology trends from this year’s Consumer Electronics Show.

ces, consumer electronics show, smartwatches, the verge, tvs, chris zeigler, fuel-cell car

Jan. 10, 2014

Food Failures: How to Spoil Your Food (and Eat It, Too)

Fermentation guru Sandor Katz solves your pickling problems.

salivate, fermentation, sandor katz, pickle, pickling, yogurt, fermenting, ferment

Jan. 10, 2014

Wine Science: Deconstructing ‘Terroir’ in the Lab

Chemist Gavin Sacks says talk of terroir may often be simply a clever marketing ploy.

gavin sacks, terroir, wine, flavor, soil

Jan. 10, 2014

Out of the Bottle: Tricks of the Trade

Popular wine jargon such as "breathing," "corked," and "wine tears" gets translated into chemistry you can understand.

wine, flavor, corked, tears, gavin sacks

Jan. 03, 2014

App Chat: Cutting Clutter From Your Inbox

Ellis Hamburger, a reporter for The Verge, talks about a few of his favorite mail-managing apps.

the verge, mail managing, inbox, mail, you've got mail, too much mail, organizing

Jan. 03, 2014

Forty Years of the Endangered Species Act

Currently, there are 2,142 U.S. and foreign species protected under the Endangered Species Act.

ESA, endangered species act, endangered species, animals, plants, Joe Roman, Peter Alagona

Jan. 03, 2014

Extracting Data From Photos of Our Eyes

Researchers used photographs to recover reflected images 30,000 times smaller than the actual subject.

photographs, data, eyes, eyeballs, corneal reflections, plos one, rob jenkins

Jan. 03, 2014

Why Do Insects Bug Us?

Author Jeffrey Lockwood dissects our complicated relationship with insects.

insects, grasshoppers, fear, anxiety, entomologist, jeffrey lockwood, The Infested Mind: Why Humans Fear, Love, and Loathe Insects

Jan. 03, 2014

Can Plants Think?

Plants can hear, taste and feel, as Michael Pollan writes in his latest piece for The New Yorker. But is any of that evidence of intelligence?

michael pollan, plants, feeling, caterpillars, can plants think, do plants think, botanical, botany, plant intelligence

Dec. 27, 2013

Carl Sagan: ‘Science Is a Way of Thinking’

In this 1996 interview, Carl Sagan talks about pseudoscience, UFOs, and the origins of the universe.

carl sagan, ufos, universe, universe origins, origins of the universe, the demon-haunted world, pseudoscience, contact movie, contact, jodi foster

Dec. 27, 2013

Temple Grandin: ‘My Mind Works Like Google Images’

In this 2006 interview, Temple Grandin explains how her autism helps her understand animal behavior.

temple grandin, autism, animal rights, activism, animals in translation

Dec. 27, 2013

Oliver Sacks and the Search for the Giant Squid

In this 1997 conversation, neurologist Oliver Sacks describes the island of the colorblind, then chats with a researcher searching for giant squid.

oliver sacks, the island of the colorblind, giant squid, clyde roper, smithsonian

Dec. 20, 2013

Unpacking DARPA’s and Google’s Robotics Interests

Google has purchased eight robotics companies in the last half-year.

mit technology review, google, defense department, engineers, robots, robotics, lifelike robots, darpa robotics challenge

Dec. 20, 2013

Christmas Bird Count 2013

An update from the annual birding holiday tradition: the Audubon Christmas Bird Count.

cbc, audubon, christmas bird count, birds, geoff lebaron, emma greig, cornell, project feederwatch, feeder watch, county birds, birding, birder, binoculars, winter, holiday traditions

Dec. 20, 2013

Out of the Bottle: Wine Flavor

A researcher from Cornell details the chemical composition of wine’s diverse flavor profiles.

gavin sacks, wine, cornell university, flavor profile, oaky, peppery, floral, citrusy, wine taste

Dec. 20, 2013

A Year of Ups and Downs for Science

Ira Flatow and a panel of editors and bloggers discuss the year’s biggest science stories.

science, year in review, 2013, gene patents, government shutdown

Dec. 13, 2013

This Doc's Miracle Drug? Exercise

Doctor Jordan Metzl says specific cardio and strength training regimens can treat a variety of ills.

jordan metzl, exercize, disease, ailments

Dec. 13, 2013

In a New Play, Trusty Sidekick Is a Supercomputer

Madeleine George’s new play explores our dependency on technology—and each other.

the curious case of the watson intelligence, play, madeleine george

Dec. 13, 2013

Science Book Picks for 2013

Journalist Deborah Blum and Maria Popova of Brainpickings.org share their top science books of 2013.

deborah blum, maria popova, brainpickings, brain pickings, science, books, science books, holiday gifts presents, christmas, best books, 2013

Dec. 13, 2013

Reggie Watts Builds a Synthesizer, Bit by Bit

How do synths work? Reggie Watts shows off a synthesizer you can build yourself.

reggie watts, synthesizer, diy, little bits, synth kit, comedian, comedy

AVAILABLE IN ITUNES

Michael Pollan Talks Plants and Food

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Strange Fish

Dr. Seuss's McElligot's Pool (1947) features some fantastic fish—ones with pinwheel-like tails, curly noses, long floppy ears, or Kangaroo pouches. The fictional fish do have some truly strange nonfictional cousins, among which are giant oarfish, barreleye fish, and sawfish.

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